Sport

Brazil beats Chile, advances to World Cup quarter finals

Andy Scott

Nervous Brazil beat Chile 3-2 on penalties to reach the World Cup quarter-finals after an epic battle that left Neymar and his teammates in tears.

Fans celebrate Brazil's 3-2 victory against Chile. (Reuters)

Two first half-goals and were also the teams managed in a fast-paced and tense 90 minutes and extra time in the Mineirao Stadium on Saturday.

Gonzalo Jara missed the decisive penalty for Chile, crashing his shot against the post and across the face of the goal, to continue his country’s record of World Cup misery against Brazil.

Willian and Hulk both missed from the spot for Brazil. But David Luiz, Marcelo and Neymar all kept their cool to score while Julio Cesar made crucial saves from Mauricio Pinilla and Alexis Sanchez.

Neymar sank to his knees in disbelief afterwards amid widespread tears of joy. Some of the Chilean players hid their weeping under their shirts as they left the field.

Earlier on a hot afternoon in Belo Horizonte, Sanchez pounced on poor Brazlian defending to equalise for Chile in the 32nd minute, cancelling out an 18th-minute opener for the hosts that appeared to be an own-goal by Jara but was awarded by FIFA to David Luiz.

Brazil had the majority of the chances, but were overcome by nerves in the second half and were hugely lucky to survive at the end of extra time when substitute Pinilla lashed a shot against the bar from the edge of the area.

Luiz Felipe Scolari’s side now look forward to a quarter-final against either Uruguay or Colombia in Fortaleza, while Chile contemplate a last-16 exit at the hands of Brazil, just as they suffered in 1998 and 2010.

As in all of their group games, Brazil started frantically amid a backdrop of deafening noise from the crowd of almost 60 000.

Chile were subjected to the sort of high and energetic pressing game they normally inflict upon others and Marcelo shot narrowly wide before English referee Howard Webb rejected loud appeals for a penalty when Hulk went down in the area after coming together with Mauricio Isla.

However, Brazil and their fans celebrated in the 18th minute. Neymar swung in a corner from the left and Thiago Silva headed the ball on towards the back post, went into the net off Jara who was under pressure from David Luiz.

‘Weather a storm’
Chile, who also lost to Brazil in the 1962 semi-finals, faced a huge challenge to come from behind, but Brazil allowed them to control possession and gifted them an equaliser.

Hulk made a carelessly pass, allowing Eduardo Vargas to pounce and set up Sanchez, who had hardly been involved in the game but came alive to coolly beat Julio Cesar in goal.

Jorge Sampaoli’s side were then forced to weather a storm into half-time that saw a Neymar header deflected past the post and Claudio Bravo tip a powerful 30-yard drive from Daniel Alves over the bar.

Chile looked more comfortable after the restart, even if they had a let-off 10 minutes into the second half when Hulk succeeded in turning the ball into the net with his knee and wheeled away in celebration.

Hulk thought he had redeemed himself for his error in Chile’s equaliser, but the referee ruled that he had controlled the ball with his arm and brandished a yellow card to the burly forward.

As nerves took hold, Brazil needed Cesar to come to the rescue with a fine reaction save from an Aranguiz shot, while Neymar, so often the hosts’ source of genuine inspiration, faded from the game.

Instead Hulk came to the forefront. He delivered a glorious cross from the left that Jo, on in place of Fred, could not convert and then stung the palms of Bravo after accelerating into the box.

In the first period of extra time, Hulk produced another trademark thunderbolt from 30 yards that was blocked by Bravo.

Chile, meanwhile, seemed happy to take their chances in the lottery of a penalty shoot-out. Pinilla almost won it right at the last, only for the woodwork to rescue Brazil, as it did again from Jara’s crucial penalty. â€“Sapa-AFP

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