Author

 
Fatima Hassan

Fatima Hassan

    Agent Provocateur: Hands off our parastatals
    Agent Provocateur: Hands off our parastatals
    The investment world would have been up in arms by now if South African Airways were a private company, writes Fatima Hassan.
    State Secrecy
    State Secrecy
    Fatima Hassan writes about her disappointment in the head of the ad hoc committee for the Protection of State Information Bill.
    Alarm over baby deaths in Khayelitsha
    Alarm over baby deaths in Khayelitsha
    Cape Town officials accused of downplaying a 'growing' crisis in poor areas.
    Rainbow nation, red tape
    Rainbow nation, red tape
    I have spent most of my life trying to fight injustice -- and thankfully there is still the space to do so in South Africa. But not once did I consider the impact of South Africa's archaic public- and private-sector rules on people who were born elsewhere. Of course, for many if not most political and economic refugees, coming to South Africa is a harrowing experience.
    Rainbow nation, red tape
    Rainbow nation, red tape
    I have spent most of my life trying to fight injustice -- and thankfully there is still the space to do so in South Africa. But not once did I consider the impact of South Africa's archaic public- and private-sector rules on people who were born elsewhere. Of course, for many if not most political and economic refugees, coming to South Africa is a harrowing experience.
    Roll-out, what roll-out?
    Roll-out, what roll-out?
    Recently, the minister of health, officials in the department of health and in the Government Communication and Information System, President Thabo Mbeki and Medical Research Council head Anthony Mbewu stated that South Africa has the "largest treatment programme in the world" and the "fastest roll-out on the planet". This is simply not the case.
    Slow road to drugs roll-out
    Slow road to drugs roll-out
    In November 2003 the Cabinet approved a national plan for HIV/ Aids prevention, care and treatment. The plan estimated that 53 000 people would be placed on anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment by the end of March this year. Eight months on, fewer than 10 000 people with HIV/Aids are receiving anti-retrovirals through the public health system.