On our Lists this week: EWM Mesatywa and Harriet Tubman

Drummer JT Lewis, guitarist Brandon Ross and bassist Melvin Gibbs take their cues from abolitionist Harriet Tubman’s deep commitment to freedom.

Drummer JT Lewis, guitarist Brandon Ross and bassist Melvin Gibbs take their cues from abolitionist Harriet Tubman’s deep commitment to freedom.

THE PLAY LIST

Nocturne. United States collective The Heard has a new podcast called Nocturne, created by producer Vanessa Lowe’s wave of insomnia. The podcast mixes interesting storytelling, documentary and fiction with incredible sound to provide midnight entertainment that will see you through any frustrating bedtime situation. (KS)

Harriet Tubman.
I have probably been put on to this musical group a million and one times, but only now have I woken from my slumber. Drummer JT Lewis, guitarist Brandon Ross and bassist Melvin Gibbs take their cues from abolitionist Harriet Tubman’s deep commitment to freedom. It is lofty ideals filtered through bewitching simplicity, otherwise called “open music”. (KS)

Beatriz at Dinner. A make-up-free Salma Hayek plays a healer who lives a modest, spiritually attuned life and whose client is a rich Beverly Hills Best Supportive Wife to a gajillionaire husband. When Beatriz’s old car fails to start after the client’s appointment, on the night that the rich couple is meant to host an even richer guest for an imminent business deal, two worlds collide when Beatriz stays for dinner and white and male fragility are confronted by the realness of a brown Mexican guest. This film is not what you think it is, has a Spanish filmmaking art to it and I loved it. It’s coming to South Africa in December. (MB)

THE READING LIST

EWM Mesatywa: Izaci namaqhalo esiXhosa. In between contemplations with my bed books, I like to sit in my living room listening to the silence of the morning as it breaks. It is in the pages of this little book that the divinity of language makes itself known. I’ve had it since high school and each time I return to read a proverb and idiom that speaks to what I’m going through, it becomes clear to me that, unless I intentionally hold on to it, the likelihood of losing my language is more apparent than I would like to admit. There is so much humour, so much depth and a beguiling beauty in the way isiXhosa makes you think. (MB)

The Lists are compiled by Friday editor Milisuthando Bongela and Kwanele Sosibo

Client Media Releases

ITWeb Cloud Summit 2019: call for papers is open
UKZN architecture students win at PG Bison competition
NHBRC trains the disabled in OHS skills
ContinuitySA celebrates a decade in Mozambique
MTN brings back Mahala Calls for prepaid subscribers