On our Lists this week: Chimamanda, Ray BLK, and Guillermo del Toro

The single Patience won’t change your world, or even shake you a little, but it’s a good track for a walk on a rainy day. (Ray BLK)

The single Patience won’t change your world, or even shake you a little, but it’s a good track for a walk on a rainy day. (Ray BLK)

THE READING LIST

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The daughter of postcolonial theory. This is an Al Jazeera article by Grace A Musila, author and associate professor in the English Department at Stellenbosch University, about the Paris edition of the Night of Ideas where Adichie was interviewed. Someone asked her about her opinion of postcolonial theory. Andiche responded: “I think it is something that professors made up because they needed to get jobs.” What I really like about this is the arguably inextricable link between the writer’s success and postcolonial theory. (MB)

THE PLAY LIST

Patience: Ray BLK. I’ve been Jones-ing for a Soundcloud-esque artist but you should try Ray BLK’s freestyle on instant gratification. It won’t change your world, or even shake you a little, but it’s a good track for a walk on a rainy day. I listened to a few of her other tracks — Chill Out, 5050 and Doing Me — and it’s a resounding “yes” from me. (ZH)

The Shape of Water. The love story might be flat and some of the supporting roles inconsequential but Guillermo del Toro’s film has a self-contained and distinctive design that has seen it compared to the director’s earlier film Pan’s Labyrinth. Although the two share thematic similarities, Pan’s Labyrinth’s assault on the imagination is total and engulfing while The Shape of Water is comparatively stripped down. (KS)

The Lists were compiled by Milisuthando Bongela, Kwanele Sosibo and Zaza Hlalethwa

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