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MAIL & GUARDIAN: Thought Leader

Conspiracy theories: Do your research and question ‘facts’

People’s powerful belief in their views, in defiance of specialists in a subject, are amplified by social media and are then viewed as fact — when in fact it’s false

US needs a gutsy Biden now

With political polarisations running deep after a divisive Trump presidency, the new administration will need to rid the country of crises on several fronts

Trade with America thrived under Trump

Mutual mistrust there may have been, but economic activity between South Africa and the superpower remained robust. Now exports must diversify and create jobs

Resilience after blowing the whistle

Success demands effort, but specifically effort expended on the right ventures for the right reasons — this is worth remembering when times are hard, such as when I blew the whistle on my employer for withholding information relevant to the state capture inquiry

Businesses not always free to keep the peace

Why is the private sector in Africa more likely to hinder instead of help peaceful development?

Revisiting an old favourite in the new Star Trek: Discovery

Viewers will find in the series an exemplar of the exploration of forms of otherness most people have never dreamed of, as well as of divergent ways to act in unison

The paradox of customary marriages

Just because they are performed differently from civil unions does not mean they don’t come with the same responsibilities — people just don’t know it

The story as a creative psychological quest

To combat anxiety in a disrupted, pandemic-riddled world, it’s better to channel creativity into storytelling, art and design than into conspiracy theories

The devil is going down to Georgia

But it might be best for everyone, Democrats included, if they lost the senate elections

Political elites, not foreigners, are to blame for South Africa’s problems

What if we told foreigners to voetsek? We have fallen victim to the illusion of scarcity. And we are led to wrongly believe immigrants are a threat

Whose life is it anyway?

The way we deal with abortion is shaped and directed by the language we use to talk about it

Environmental justice protects people too

The growth of sectors such as agriculture and mining, which is good for the economy, often causes damage to the natural environment, which in turn hurts people

Malawi elections provide a global lesson in democracy

COMMENT: Opposition candidates and party can increase their chances of success at the polls by putting aside minor differences and presenting a united front

Eskom’s emissions are not compatible with the South African constitution

The government must not cave to Eskom’s demand that it be exempt from air pollution rules. Furthermore, the power utility needs to stay true to the principles of its own just transition strategy

Peacemaking criminology as ubuntu: A reply to Thuli Madonsela

If the rich and powerful are afforded amnesty, then so too must the poor who are often pushed into lives of crime

The uberfication of the university

The pandemic is hastening neoliberal universities’ moves towards platform pedagogy, where lecturers become participants in the “just-in-time” gig economy and students become “clients”

ANC plays a game of dodgeball

The mayor of Durban avoids almost all the questions whereas Gwede ducks and dives amid his tiger tales

Zille’s reprise is getting weird

With Maimane and Trollip gone, it seems the DA trying to turn back the hands of time to 2015 — or even 1652

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