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Elections 2024     |     Wed 19 Jun


This limited series newsletter offers deep dives and timely updates from the Mail & Guardian’s esteemed politics and elections team. Your essential guide through South Africa’s pivotal elections, enriched by our historic journey from apartheid to democracy. Allow us to connect the past, present, and future of our nation’s democratic evolution.


Promises of jobs, grants as Fikile Mbalula hits KZN campaign trail

ANC secretary general Fikile Mbalula led the ANC’s door-to-door campaign in Inanda and Ntuzuma, north-west of Durban this week, calling on residents to resist “fashion” — a reference to the breakaway uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) party led by Jacob Zuma — and stay with their political “home.”

// READ MORE

T-shirts of Chris Hani as an MK commander mark Sexwale’s ANC campaign trail

Former Gauteng premier Tokyo Sexwale marked his return to the ANC campaign trail in Ekurhuleni by handing out T-shirts and recalling Chris Hani’s memory as uMkhonto weSizwe’s (MK’s) chief of staff.
// READ MORE


Report finds MK party, voter apathy and lack of trust mar election certainty

As the general election nears, a palpable sense of uncertainty shrouds South Africa’s political landscape, casting doubt on the future composition of the government for the first time since 1994.
// READ MORE


 


 

FROM THE ARCHIVES | THIS WEEK 30 YEARS AGO

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FROM THE ARCHIVES | 20 YEARS AGO

United States senator Eugene McCarthy once remarked that politicians react to the cold in much the same way as pigs — they stand in a circle with their snouts between the hind legs of the pig in front.

This is the likely outcome of election 2004 for the main opposition parties, none of which can be overjoyed with the results at national or provincial levels. The probability is that the Democratic Alliance (DA) and the Inkatha Freedom Party will be driven into a warmer embrace, while the decimated New National Party (NNP) will have no choice but to force its snout more firmly between the hind legs of the ANC.

That is how M&G writer Drew Forrest started his piece 20 years ago.

The 2004 South African elections underscored the fragmentation of the opposition, particularly affecting the Democratic Alliance (DA), Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP), and the now-defunct New National Party (NNP). Despite hopes for a stronger two-party system, the results showed minimal gains for these parties, with the NNP facing a near collapse and the emergence of the Independent Democrats (ID) led by Patricia de Lille, who significantly impacted the electoral landscape, especially in the Western Cape. The ANC maintained its dominance, benefiting from the opposition’s inability to consolidate or significantly challenge its leadership. Forrest’s analysis provides a detailed examination of the election dynamics, including strategic errors and the regional shifts that influenced the outcomes.

Forrest finished his piece like this, “The fact is that the ANC has not erred catastrophically enough in government to give the opposition a foot in the door. Elections are not won or lost on foreign policy, meaning that Zimbabwe has not been an electoral issue. Official corruption is not sufficiently advanced. And the ruling party drew back on HIV/Aids in time to avert major damage at the polls.

The big freeze is not yet over for the opposition parties. Until their opportunity comes, they have little choice but to huddle together and keep their snouts warm.”

READ THE FULL REPUBLISHED PIECE HERE

 

 


 

ARE FIRM ANC VOTERS FINALLY TURNING THEIR BACKS?

In Buffalo City, the ANC’s growing voter share in the 2021 local government polls contrasts sharply with the deteriorating housing and water infrastructure. Frustrated by unmet government promises, many residents are planning to boycott the upcoming general elections in protest. The area is plagued by widespread use of bucket toilets and a large number of homes classified as disadvantaged, reflecting the deepening economic strife. Discontent is palpable among constituents like Mzikazi Tyakume, who articulate a profound disenchantment with the ANC, driven by personal and communal struggles exacerbated by poor municipal services.

Khaya Koko, returning to the area, reports that the stark poverty remains unchanged. He notes that numerous residents, historically staunch ANC supporters, have declared their intention to abstain from voting in the national elections later this month, signaling a potential shift in political loyalty.

Catch the full story next week on mg.co.za

Screenshot 2024 05 10 At 08.57.24

 


 

TAKE THE QUIZ – FIND OUT WHO YOU SHOULD REALLY VOTE FOR

The IEC expects more than 70 political parties to contest this year’s national elections. Take this Mail & Guardian quiz to help you find the party with which you most align. It’s only 10 questions but very enlightening.

Graphic Quiz 300x250 M&g4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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