Survey shows youth want Zuma gone

Three in five young South Africans do not want President Jacob Zuma to be re-elected for a second term. (Gallo)

Three in five young South Africans do not want President Jacob Zuma to be re-elected for a second term. (Gallo)

"The results of the survey showed that 61% of South Africa's youth would not like to see President Jacob Zuma re-elected and believe it's time for him to go," Pondering Panda said in a statement on Friday.

"Less than a third (29%) of respondents said they would be happy to see him re-elected and 10% either weren't able to decide or didn't care."

The survey polled 4 190 South Africans between the ages of 18 and 34. According to the results, Zuma had less support among women than men. About 64% of women wanted Zuma to go, compared to 57% of men.

Zuma's support also varied amongst racial groups with 58% blacks, 69% whites, 74% Coloured and 79% of Indians saying they would not want him re-elected.

Geographically, KwaZulu-Natal remained Zuma's stronghold, according to the survey.
This was the only province where support for his re-election (48%) outweighed those who wanted him gone (40%).

KwaZulu-Natal is Zuma's home province and the ANC's biggest province in terms of members.

Butch Rice, market analyst for Pondering Panda, said it was time for Zuma to go. "For an incumbent president, his support among young South Africans is abysmal," Rice said.

"They clearly feel he has not lived up to his promises and is not doing a good enough job as president."

Previous research had shown that the biggest issues for young South Africans were unemployment and crime.

"Until the government tackles these issues head-on, and makes real headway, it will not have the support of the country's youth," said Rice.

Zuma will be seeking re-election at the ANC's elective conference in Mangaung in December. Nominations are expected to open in October. – Sapa

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