Author

 
Giles Fraser

Giles Fraser

    Empty words, broken lives in northern Iraq
    Empty words, broken lives in northern Iraq
    The place the Yazidi call home has been seeded with tens of thousands of mines.
    Think of God, think of a crying infant
    Think of God, think of a crying infant
    Christmas presents God as a baby, invoking Christianity as a deeper form of humanism.
    Peace a dirty word in time of war
    Peace a dirty word in time of war
    Even those Israelis who are secretly against the military assault on Gaza are cautious about voicing their opposition openly.
    Are modern detectives the new priests?
    Are modern detectives the new priests?
    Our obsession with fiction such as "True Detective" suggests something remarkably adjacent to traditional theological concerns, writes Giles Fraser.
    Can you be too religious?
    Can you be too religious?
    When considering this question, note that Jesus himself was hostile to religiosity – and that fundamentalists suffer from a lack of faith.
    The spiritual side of boredom
    The spiritual side of boredom
    Once a luxury claimed by the idle rich, languor is now the ultimate personal failing.
    Talking about death could make our passing less soulless
    Talking about death could make our passing less soulless
    Instead of outsourcing all talk of death to medics, priests and undertakers some people have embraced the more personalised idea of "death cafes".
    Blame psychological warfare
    Blame psychological warfare
    The latest Kandahar massacre has illustrated how soldier's have hardened and how their natural 'shoot-to-miss' instinct have been stifled.
    'Just war' erodes Christian belief
    'Just war' erodes Christian belief
    Far from being wishy-washy, Christians are right to be wary of any justification for violence.
    King James Bible's longevity proves bigoted is better
    King James Bible's longevity proves bigoted is better
    Who said this? "We are a Christian culture, we come from a Christian culture, and not to know the King James Bible is to be, in some way barbarian.
    More art. More prayer. More holidays
    More art. More prayer. More holidays
    The headlines were grabbed by the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams's attack on United States foreign policy. But the deeper point, widely missed, was his attack on Western modernity in general. "There is something about Western modernity which really does eat away at the soul," he said in an interview with the Muslim magazine, Emel, late last year.