Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Gender Commission fully behind Caster Semenya

The Commission for Gender Equality has expressed its dismay that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) has decided to amend its regulations once again in November 2018.

The new regulations would require female athletes to maintain testosterone levels below 5 nanomoles per litre for a continuous period of at least six months.

This has led to athletes, like Semenya, who are known to produce high levels of testosterone, being placed squarely in the spotlight.

The commission believes the new regulations are discriminatory against athletes falling into this category.

READ MORE: Bad science won’t undo Semenya

The body has also called upon UN Women, the Department of Sports and Recreation, Athletics South Africa (ASA) and the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) to offer their support to Semenya as the Commission believes the IAAF new regulations are discriminatory.

The statement went on to state that “It cannot be that female athletes that produce 5% of nanomoles are subjected to this unjust and unfair regulations contrary to many conventions and protocols that are there to protect and promote unfair treatment of female athletes/women from abuse and discrimination.”

The Commission reiterated its support for the legal challenge launched by Semenya with the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) in Switzerland on Monday against the new regulation in order to ensure that the rights of all women are safeguarded and protected.

“We are also making a clarion call to like-minded institutions to unequivocally raise their voices in support of Semenya.”

The commission agrees with Semenya’ submission to CAS that the IAAF must set aside the new regulations even before they are implemented pending the finalisation of her legal challenge. — Sport 24

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Agency
External source

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Family wants clarity on SANDF soldier killed in friendly fire...

Corporal Simanga Khuselo join the peacekeeping mission in the DRC to save money to build his family a home

SA soldiers have been fighting in a distant land for...

Troops were sent to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2001 as part of the UN peacekeeping mission that became an offensive against rebels

More top stories

Family wants clarity on SANDF soldier killed in friendly fire...

Corporal Simanga Khuselo join the peacekeeping mission in the DRC to save money to build his family a home

SA soldiers have been fighting in a distant land for...

Troops were sent to the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2001 as part of the UN peacekeeping mission that became an offensive against rebels

UK red list will hit South African tourism hard

More than 430 000 British tourists visited South Africa in 2019 but this dropped by 97% last year because of Covid-19

Shoprite among firms that failed in Africa, Europe, Australia

Corporate South Africa is feeling the Covid-19 pinch. But is there space for growth domestically?
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×