Author

 
Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman

Nic Cheeseman is Professor of Democracy at the University of Birmingham and was formerly the Director of the African Studies Centre at Oxford University. He mainly works on democracy, elections and development and has conducted fieldwork in a range of African countries including Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The articles that he has published based on this research have won a number of prizes including the GIGA award for the best article in Comparative Area Studies (2013) and the Frank Cass Award for the best article in Democratization (2015). Professor Cheeseman is also the author or editor of ten books, including Democracy in Africa (2015), Institutions and Democracy in Africa (2017), How to Rig an Election (2018), and Coalitional Presidentialism in Comparative Perspective (2018). In addition, he is the founding editor of the Oxford Encyclopaedia of African Politics, a former editor of the journal African Affairs, and an advisor to, and writer for, Kofi Annan's African Progress Panel. A frequent commentator of African and global events, Professor Cheeseman’s analysis has appeared in the Economist, Le Monde, Financial Times, Newsweek, the Washington Post, New York Times, BBC, Daily Nation and he writes a regular column for the Mail & Guardian. In total, his articles have been read over a million times. Many of his interviews and insights can be found on the website that he founded and co-edits, www.democracyinafrica.org.
UK visas discriminate against Africans
UK visas discriminate against Africans
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced plans to change immigration rules to make the United Kingdom “even more open, even more...
WhatsApp played a big role in the Nigerian election. Not all of it was bad
WhatsApp played a big role in the Nigerian election. Not all of it was bad
There is growing concern about the potential for the message and media sharing platform WhatsApp to undermine democracy in a number of countries...
How to get women’s voices heard in African politics
How to get women’s voices heard in African politics
Across the world activists are working hard to get more women in politics. But getting women into politics is only half of the challenge. The...
How democratic revolutions are being subverted in Algeria and Sudan
How democratic revolutions are being subverted in Algeria and Sudan
The scenes in Sudan were inspiring. Tens of thousands of people risked their own safety to face down a brutal government and demand change. The...
The pros and cons of coalitions in SA
The pros and cons of coalitions in SA
South Africans go to the polls today in the first general election since President Cyril Ramaphosa came to power. While the ANC is set for another...
Presidents for life spell danger
Presidents for life spell danger
Algeria and Sudan are engulfed by protests against leaders who have overstayed their welcome. Their stories need to be told, but we must also...
Algeria, Sudan and the danger of presidents-for-life
Algeria, Sudan and the danger of presidents-for-life
Algeria and Sudan are engulfed by protests against leaders who have overstayed their welcome. Their stories are vital and need to be told, but we...
New dictionary provides nuanced insights into the language of African politics
New dictionary provides nuanced insights into the language of African politics
Every country has its own political language. These terms and phrases that have developed over time give distinctive meanings that may not be fully...
Why African democracies are failing women — and what we can do to fix it
Why African democracies are failing women — and what we can do to fix it
The fundamental equality of citizens in terms of their right to vote and participate in the political system is a cornerstone of democracy. So why...
Sudan is Africa’s secret crisis
Sudan is Africa’s secret crisis
I don’t normally write about Sudan. But now I have to. For the last few weeks, friends and democracy activists from the country have been sending...
No, Africa doesn’t need more strongmen
No, Africa doesn’t need more strongmen
The evidence is conclusive: over and over again, democrats trump dictators
Why there’s a case for giving foreign aid to authoritarian regimes
Why there’s a case for giving foreign aid to authoritarian regimes
Should democracies give foreign aid to countries that are not democracies?