Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Japanese cellphone ringtone ‘cures hayfever’

The Japanese firm behind a dog-bark translation machine and cellphone ring tones meant to attract members of the opposite sex has a new spring-time offering — a mobile phone application to cure hayfever.

The Japan Ringing Tone Laboratory has released its latest invention just in time for the cherry blossom season, when white and pink petals shower the country and pollen allergies and sinus problems cause misery for millions.

The Tokyo-based high-tech gadget maker promises its newest cellphone ringtone can bring relief when users hold the handsets under their noses.

According to the developer, Dr Matsumi Suzuki, who says on his website that he studies acoustics and analyses voiceprints, the ring tone unleashes waves that will shake out pollen stuck in the user’s nose.

Index Corporation, which markets the ring tone, warned that the effectiveness may vary among users.

“There is no guarantee that this has real health benefits,” warned a company spokesperson. She added that the number of downloads has been three times that of their other ringtones, without disclosing sales figures.

The company has also come up with ringtones it says help users attract members of the opposite sex, lose weight, quit smoking, digest food and relieve shoulder aches.

It also developed the Bowlingual gadget that can “translate” dog barks into human language, sold by toymaker Takara Tomy since 2002.

The gadget has a handset and a microphone attached to a dog collar that is billed as analysing six emotions including joy, sadness and frustration, and utters phrases such as “Play with me!” A version also exists for cats. – AFP

Subscribe to the M&G

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them.

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Micro-hydropower lights up an Eastern Cape village

There is hidden potential for small hydropower plants in South Africa

MK committee to look into Gupta influence in military veteran’s...

Party insiders say a report on the Guptas’ association with leaders of the Umkhonto weSizwe Military Veterans’ Association will help rid the structure of Jacob Zuma’s most loyal allies

More top stories

‘Vaccinate inmates to avoid crisis’

Delaying the vaccination of prisoners could lead to a public health disaster

Naspers and Prosus in share swap Catch-22

Asset managers are concerned about the share exchange but others welcome it because Naspers has dominated the JSE

As South Africa’s Covid infections surge, the number of jabs...

Hospitals are under strain, nurses are burning out and infections are on the rise, but there are limited Covid-19 vaccine doses available

SAA: PIC allegations are Harith’s albatross

Sipho Makhubela assures that the private equity firm has what it takes to raise the capital to get SAA flying again
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×