Gaddafi son in Niger on humanitarian asylum

Niger has decided to grant Muammar Gaddafi’s son Saadi asylum for humanitarian reasons, President Mahamadou Issoufou said on Friday, adding that his brother Seif al-Islam is not in the country.

“We have agreed on granting asylum on Saadi Gaddafi for humanitarian reasons,” Issoufou told a news conference at the end of a two-day visit to South Africa.

“Seif al-Islam is not in Niger. I would have to consider what to do if he comes,” he said.

“We will deal with issues in terms of law and democracy and international agreements.”

Saadi Gaddafi (38) fled Libya across its southern frontier to Niger in August during the fall of Tripoli that ended his authoritarian father’s 42-year regime.


Libya’s new leadership wants Saadi Gaddafi to stand trial for crimes allegedly committed while heading the country’s football federation.

Niger’s Prime Minister Brigi Rafini said in September that there was “no question” of extraditing Saadi, at least until he could be assured of a fair trial in Libya.

Seif al-Islam, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court in relation to crimes against humanity allegedly committed during the crackdown against Libyan protests. — AFP

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