African leaders call for stronger ties with US

African leaders on Tuesday called for a deeper economic relationship with the United States, hailing investment pledges totaling more than $17-billion at a Washington summit as a fresh step in the right direction.

US and African companies and the World Bank pledged new investment in construction, energy and information technology projects in Africa at the US-Africa Business Forum, including several joint ventures between US and African partners.

“The United States is determined to be a partner in Africa’s success,” President Barack Obama said in a speech at the forum. “A good partner, an equal partner, and a partner for the long term.”

The US president also urged African officials to create conditions to support foreign investment and growth.

“Capital is one thing, development programs and projects are one thing, but rule of law, regulatory reforms, good governance, those things matter even more,” he said.

African leaders said they were optimistic about becoming full partners in a relationship worth an estimated $85-billion a year in trade flows, as US business leaders eyed opportunities in the region, home to six of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies – even if they might be late to the party.

“We gave it to the Europeans first and to the Chinese later, but today it’s wide open for us,” said the chief executive of General Electric, Jeff Immelt, who on Monday announced $2-billion to boost infrastructure, worker skills and access to energy.

‘Aid donor and aid recipient’
Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete said Africa wanted to move away from a relationship of “aid donor and aid recipient” to one of investment and trade.

Kikwete told the forum that with Obama and senior officials encouraging the business community “to take Africa seriously, I think this time we will make it.”

More than 90 US companies participated in the forum, part of a three-day summit, which has brought almost 50 African leaders to the US capital, including Chevron, Citigroup, Ford Motor, Lockheed Martin, Marriott International and Morgan Stanley .


Many already have a foothold in the region, which is expected to have a larger work force than China or India by 2040 and boasts the world’s fastest-growing middle class, supporting demand for consumable goods.

Working as partners
Coca-Cola said it would invest $5-billion with African bottling partners in new manufacturing lines and equipment, as well as safe water access programs, over six years, and the chief executive of IBM, Ginni Rometty, said the IT giant would plow more than $2-billion into the region over seven years.

Still, Aliko Dangote, the president of Nigeria’s Dangote Group, whose operations include cement making, flour milling and sugar refining, said nothing works without adequate power.

Dangote signed an agreement to jointly invest $5-billion in energy projects in sub-Saharan Africa with Blackstone Group funds, also calling for the US Export-Import Bank to remain open to support African companies buying US goods.

The World Bank, which committed $5-billion to support electricity generation, estimates that one in three Africans, or 600-million people, lack access to electricity despite rapid economic growth expected to top 5% in 2015 and 2016.

Obama took part in a discussion with chief executives and government leaders at the event, also attended by US Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker as well as former president Bill Clinton and former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.

“These deals and investments demonstrate that the time is ripe to work together as partners, in a spirit of mutual understanding and respect – to raise living standards in all of our nations and to address the challenges that impede our ability to develop closer economic bonds,” Pritzker said.

Family ties to the continent
African telecoms billionaire Mo Ibrahim encouraged US businesses to invest in Africa and make money but also said they should “pay their taxes”.

In the evening the African leaders joined Obama and his wife Michelle at a lavish dinner at the White House, where the president referred to his family ties to the continent.

“I stand before you as the president of the United States and a proud American. I also stand before you as the son of a man from Africa,” Obama said to applause. “The blood of Africa runs through our family, and so for us the bonds between our countries, our continents, are deeply personal.” – Reuters

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever. But it comes at a cost. Advertisers are cancelling campaigns, and our live events have come to an abrupt halt. Our income has been slashed.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years. We’ve survived thanks to the support of our readers, we will need you to help us get through this.

To help us ensure another 35 future years of fiercely independent journalism, please subscribe.

Lesley Wroughton
Lesley Wroughton works from Washington. I write about U.S. Foreign Policy for Reuters based in Washington. Opinions are my own and retweets are not an endorsement. Lesley Wroughton has over 1577 followers on Twitter.
Advertising

Two dead in new ANC KwaZulu-Natal killings

A Mtubatuba councillor and a Hammarsdale ANC Youth League leader were shot yesterday near their homes

Inside Facebook’s big bet on Africa

New undersea cables will massively increase bandwidth to the continent

No back to school for teachers just yet

Last week the basic education minister was adamant that teachers will return to school on May 25, but some provinces say not all Covid-19 measures are in place to prevent its spread

Engineering slips out of gear at varsity

Walter Sisulu University wants to reprioritise R178-million that it stands to give back to treasury after failing to spend it
Advertising

Press Releases

Coexisting with Covid-19: Saving lives and the economy in India

A staggered exit from the lockdown accompanied by stepped-up testing to cover every district is necessary for India right now

What Africa can learn from Cuba in combating the Covid-19 pandemic

Africa should abandon the neoliberal path to be able to deal with Covid-19 and other health system challenges likely to emerge in future

Road to recovery for the tourism sector: The South African perspective

The best-case scenario is that South Africa's tourism sector’s recovery will only begin in earnest towards the end of this year

Covid-19: Eased lockdown and rule of law Webinar

If you are arrested and fined in lockdown, you do get a criminal record if you pay the admission of guilt fine

Covid-19 and Frontline Workers

Who is caring for the healthcare workers? 'Working together is how we are going to get through this. It’s not just a marathon, it’s a relay'.

PPS webinar Part 2: Small business, big risk

The risks that businesses face and how they can be dealt with are something all business owners should be well acquainted with

Call for applications for the position of GCRO executive director

The Gauteng City-Region Observatory is seeking to appoint a high-calibre researcher and manager to be the executive director and to lead it

DriveRisk stays safe with high-tech thermal camera solution

Itec Evolve installed the screening device within a few days to help the driver behaviour company become compliant with health and safety regulations