Trump: I’m not a racist

US President Donald Trump vehemently denied Sunday that he is a racist, after his vulgar disparagement of African countries and Haiti complicated a bipartisan deal on immigration.

“I’m not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed,” Trump told reporters at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida, where he was having dinner with Republican House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Trump appeared to give up for dead an immigration deal, coming back on the issue in a pair of early morning tweets three days after reportedly referring to African and Haitian immigrants as coming from “shithole countries,” triggering global condemnation.

“DACA is probably dead because the Democrats don’t really want it,” Trump tweeted, referring to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program at the heart of the immigration impasse.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the country illegally as children — so-called “Dreamers” — face deportation unless a compromise can be reached that would grant them rights to stay.

A bipartisan deal to resolve the Dreamers issue in return for changes demanded by Republicans in the way visas are allocated collapsed in acrimony Thursday over Trump’s remarks, which were widely denounced as racist.

“I think this man, this president, is taking us back to another place,” John Lewis, a Georgia congressman who was on the front lines of the 1960s civil rights movement, said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.”

“I think he is a racist.”

‘Defend the indefensible’ 

Senator David Purdue, a Republican from Georgia, called charges that Trump is racist “ridiculous” and his reported remarks a “gross misrepresentation” of the White House meeting on immigration.

But other Republicans, pained by the turn of events, spoke out against the president as debate over the slur spilled into Sunday television talk shows.

“I can’t defend the indefensible,” said Mia Love, a Haitian-American congresswoman from Utah who campaigned on Trump’s behalf in the country’s Haitian community.

“I still think that he should apologize,” she said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “I think that there are people that are looking for an apology. And I think that that would show real leadership.”

Trump’s “shithole countries” remarks were confirmed by Senator Dick Durbin, a Democrat who attended the White House meeting, after it was reported by The Washington Post and other media.

But Trump has stuck with a vague denial that he used such language, and so far has made no move to apologize, hurting prospects for a deal on DACA and making life uncomfortable for Republicans as they look ahead to midterm elections this year.

The president sought to shift from the defensive by portraying Democrats as not truly interested in an immigration deal.

“They just want to talk and take desperately needed money away from our Military,” he tweeted.

“I, as President, want people coming into our Country who are going to help us become strong and great again, people coming in through a system based on MERIT. No more Lotteries! #AMERICA FIRST.”

In Florida, Trump added: “I don’t think Democrats want to make a deal. The folks from DACA should know the Democrats are the ones that aren’t going to make a deal.”

He insisted the White House was “ready, willing and able to make a deal on DACA.”

‘A deal to be had’ 

But Senator Jeff Flake, a Republican who has been critical of Trump, said Democrats were serious about a bipartisan deal on immigration.

He said the compromise presented to the White House Thursday would end a visa lottery system and so-called chain migration under which legal immigrants can bring in family members. The Dreamers would be allowed to stay but not become US citizens, according to Flake.

The senator from Arizona said Trump’s remarks came in reaction to an element of the deal that would reallocate the visas given out in a lottery to immigrants who are currently in a protected status, like Haitians and the Dreamers.

“I believe there is a deal to be had,” he said.

Trump announced in September he was scrapping the DACA program but delayed enforcement to give Congress six months — until March — to craft a lasting solution.

On Tuesday, however, a federal judge ordered the government to keep DACA going pending resolution of court challenges to the president’s decision.

Unless the order is overturned by a higher court, DACA recipients will now be eligible to submit renewal applications and the government will be required to “post reasonable public notice” that the program is once again active.

Meanwhile, dimming prospects for a 2018 spending agreement means lawmakers will have to resort to a temporary funding extension to avert a government shutdown on January 19.

Lee-Shae Salma Scharnick
Jim Mannion
Editor and Reporter , Agence France-Presse (AFP)
Advertisting

‘Judge President Hlophe tried to influence allocation of judges to...

Deputy Judge President Patricia Goliath accuses Hlophe of attempting to influence her to allocate the case to judges he perceived as ‘favourably disposed’ to former president Jacob Zuma

SAA grounds flights due to low demand

SAA is working to accommodate customers on its sister airlines after it cancelled flights due to low demand

Isabel dos Santos did not loot Angola alone

Once again, Western auditing and consulting firms shamelessly facilitated corruption on an international scale

Lekwa municipality won’t answer questions about why children died in...

Three children are dead. More than a dozen homes have been gutted by fires in the past six months. And, as...
Advertising

Press Releases

Upskill yourself to land your dream job in 2020

If you received admission to an IIE Higher Certificate qualification, once you have graduated, you can articulate to an IIE Diploma and then IIE Bachelor's degree at IIE Rosebank College.

South Africans unsure of what to expect in 2020

Almost half (49%) of South Africans, 15 years and older, agree or strongly agree that they view 2020 with optimism.

KZN teacher educators jet off to Columbia University

A group of academics were selected as participants of the programme focused on PhD completion, mobility, supervision capacity development and the generation of high-impact research.

New-style star accretion bursts dazzle astronomers

Associate Professor James O Chibueze and Dr SP van den Heever are part of an international team of astronomers studying the G358-MM1 high-mass protostar.

2020 risk outlook: Use GRC to build resilience

GRC activities can be used profitably to develop an integrated risk picture and response, says ContinuitySA.

MTN voted best mobile network

An independent report found MTN to be the best mobile network in SA in the fourth quarter of 2019.

Is your tertiary institution is accredited?

Rosebank College is an educational brand of The Independent Institute of Education, which is registered with the Department of Higher Education and Training.

Is your tertiary institution accredited?

Rosebank College is an educational brand of The Independent Institute of Education, which is registered with the Department of Higher Education and Training.