Guy Willoughby

A rich musical feast

<i>Love and Green Onions</i> is a rich musical feast enlivened by great performances and some fine, infectious songs, writes Guy Willoughby.

Zippin’ up his boots

Accompanied by a group of unsung folk musicians, David Kramer has gone back to his roots, writes Guy Willoughby.

Front-rankers wank in the front row

Now in its fifth year, this hugely successful funny-folk festival has made marvellous strides, writes Guy Willoughby.

The music of Fugard

Athol Fugard's <i>Valley Song</i> has been set to music by composer Thomas Rajna, writes Guy Willoughby, the instigator of the project.

No sitting on the fence

Peter Hayes's one-man drama The Fence takes a look at a famous gay hate murder in the United States, writes Guy Willoughby.

Bravo!

Not even New Age clichés have put a damper on the opera season of the Spier Summer Arts Festival, writes Guy Willoughby.

Let’s get physical

Has physical theatre given our performing arts a well-deserved kick in the pants? Or is it merely an exercise in self-indulgence, asks Guy Willoughby.

African magic

Nelson Mandela's favourite tales come alive on stage, thanks to Janice Honeyman's obsessive inclinations, writes Guy Willoughby.

Retreat into the heart of the city

Cape Town's Winchester Mansions Hotel offers guests the opportunity to experience first-rate service in opulent surroundings - all within a stone's throw of the bustling V&A Waterfront development, writes Guy Willoughby.

Bristling energy

<i>At Her Feet</i> is a brilliant, precocious theatrical achievement -- that doesn't know when to stop, writes Guy Willoughby.

Opera in hell

Opera in South Africa -- and in Cape Town in particular -- stands at a critical but exciting crossroads, writes . As Cape Town Opera CEO Angelo Gobbato recently remarked, with casts now overwhelmingly black, the search is on to win an audience fitting the same description.

Freeing Fugard

Athol Fugard's plays have tackled every hidden corner of life under the grossest of sociopolitical orders, creating as he went a record of inestimable value, writes Guy Willoughby.

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