Sudan suspects Israel behind raids on convoys

Sudan said on Friday it believed Israel was behind two attacks on suspected smuggler convoys which killed up to 40 people in the remote north of the country in January and February.

“The first thought is that it was the Americans that did it. We contacted the Americans and they categorically denied they were involved,” Foreign Ministry spokesperson Ali al-Sadig said. “We are still trying to verify it.
Most probably it involved Israel.”

His comments were the first official government acknowledgement of the strikes, first reported earlier this week in Egyptian Arabic-language newspaper el-Shorouk.

Sadig said one attack was thought to have taken place in the last week of January and one in mid-February.

“We didn’t know about the first attack until after the second one. They were in an area close to the border with Egypt, a remote area, desert, with no towns, no people,” he told Reuters.

Sudan was gathering evidence at the sites where the convoys were hit, he added.

“There is no proof they were carrying weapons. They were smuggling something, but the pickups were small. You don’t carry weapons in small pickups,” he said.

The New York Times on Friday quoted unnamed US officials as saying that Israeli warplanes carried out an attack in January that was suspected of ferrying arms to Gaza during Israel’s offensive against Hamas.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert said on Thursday that Israel acted “wherever we can” to strike at its enemies, but did not specifically mention the attack in Sudan.

“If it was Israel then it is clear that they were acting on bad information that the vehicles were carrying arms,” Sudan’s Sadig said. “It is illegal to infringe the sovereignty of another country.

He said that Sudan would not react to the attacks while an investigation is ongoing.

“We will reserve the right to react to this later. At the moment it is not confirmed it was Israel.”—Reuters

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