Komphela volunteers for Bafana job

Bafana Bafana interim coach Steve Komphela on Friday said it was a privilege to coach the national side, and that he would be prepared to fill any role assigned by the SA Football Association (Safa).

“To me this is not a job, to me this is duty for the nation,” said Komphela in Gaborone, ahead of their Group A 2014 Fifa World Cup qualifier against Botswana on Saturday.

“Each time you’re called, whether it’s [for] a second or a minute, it’s a unique and huge privilege.

“I will accept without any doubt, and I’m always willing to be there for South Africa.

“I think it would be the responsibility of the federation to [do] interviews and come up with a decision regarding whoever fits the position best.”


Komphela, who coaches Free State Stars in the Premier Soccer League, had been named as Bafana’s second assistant coach in April, as requested by the sacked Pitso Mosimane.

On Friday, he made the shortlist of five coaches that Safa will interview from next week alongside Gordon Igesund, Gavin Hunt, Shakes Mashaba and Neil Tovey.

All candidates will have to give a presentation to the Safa technical committee headed by Fanyana Sibanyoni.

“Whether I’ll stay as assistant or coach, honestly, it is the responsibility of the federation,” he said.

“So I’m aware of it, but not really bothered.” Komphela cited his experience at the highest level in a clear attempt to spell out to Safa why he should be the man for the job.

The former Bafana captain was capped 24 times between 1992 and 1995, with 17 matches as captain.

“As a South African I’m always available, I’ve done it before,” said Komphela.

“I’ve worked with [former Bafana coaches] Stuart Baxter, Carlos Queiroz and Carlos Alberto Parreira.”

The 44-year-old former SA under-23 coach explained the pressure that came with the job.

“This chair has never been cold; you sit here and it’s heated all the time,” he said. “You have to be ready and it happens all over the world.

“I don’t see a coach who says ‘I’m here for good’: even the most successful coaches move on.”

Komphela said whoever went on to take charge of the team would need time to produce results.

“The ideal state would be, let’s have a longer period [coaching contract] accompanied by results,” Komphela said.

“But [the] reality is this job is about results. “You give results, you can stay longer, but never forever. “So we’re quite aware of that, it’s not a South African phenomenon, it happens all over the world.” – Sapa

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Michael Sherman
Michael Sherman works from Knoxville, TN. Associate Professor of Religious Studies (Hebrew Bible and Ancient Judaism; Critical Animal Studies; American Religious History) Michael Sherman has over 157 followers on Twitter.
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