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Richard Mdluli ‘anxious’ to return to work again

Suspended crime intelligence boss Richard Mdluli is anxious to resume his professional duties now that he will not be prosecuted for the murder of his former love rival, Oupa Ramogibe.

This statement came courtesy of his lawyer, Ike Motloung, at the Boksburg Magistrate's Court today following magistrate Jurg Viviers's ruling that there was not enough evidence to proceed to trial.

Mdluli's former co-accused Colonel Nkosana Ximba, Lieutenant Colonel Mtunzi-Omhle Mtunzi and Warrant Officer Samuel Dlomo will also not face criminal prosecution for their alleged involvement in Ramogibe’s death.

Making his ruling, Viviers said it was unreasonable for the police to expect Ramogibe's family to give credible statements after a decade.

During the inquest, the state witnesses often contradicted each other and most admitted that they could no longer properly recall events that took place in 1999.

The defense also pointed out that it was clear that there was a sinister plot to derail Mdluli’s career by forces within the police and that was the main reason for the resuscitation of the Ramogibe murder case.

It seems Viviers agreed with the latter as he read out his findings, saying: "The force and intensity with which the investigation was resuscitated is a clear indication that the top ranking officials saw this undisposed matter as an opportunity from which they could benefit."

Although Viviers admitted that it was plausible that Mdluli had orchestrated Ramogibe's murder as the facts during the inquest had been consistent, there could have been other explanations as well.

Mdluli was not in attendance but Motloung said although he is keen to return to work, his work-related disciplinary hearing has yet to be concluded.

The South African Police Force has yet to make a ruling regarding Mdluli’s alleged role in the looting of a secret police fund.

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Nelly Shamase
Nelly is a regular contributor to the Mail & Guardian.

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