AmaZulu and Wits draw in PSL match

Defender Carlington Nyadombo fired the hosts in front via a 50th minute penalty, before substitute Bongolethu Jayiya hit back less than 120 seconds later to ensure the Students take a share of the spoils at the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban on Sunday.

Usuthu remained rooted at the bottom of the table, although the result showed more progress under new boss Rosslee, whose first match in charge in midweek was a 1-1 draw away to Black Leopards.

Wits, meanwhile, remained seventh on the standings.

The first half was a dull affair with premium chances a rarity.

After 18 minutes, a long-range attempt from Ayanda Dlamini flew straight at goalkeeper Ryan Harrison, while some sloppy defending midway through the half allowed Matthew Pattison some space in the penalty area, although the attempt eventually trickled to the fit-again Tapuwa Kapini.

Before the half hour-mark Andile Khumalo drove Usuthu forward promisingly and took the wrong option of shooting – the ball was scuffed – at the crucial time with Dlamini and Kagiso Senamela left fuming on either wing.

Khulegani Madondo then tried to spring things to life by dribbling his way past one man on the edge of the box, but the midfielder could not get his shot away through a crowded penalty area.

Goalless
The best opening of the half came four minutes before the interval when a short corner was quickly taken and a right-side cross splendidly delivered by Senamela, only for Philani Cele to put his free-header wide of goal.

It was goalless at the break and almost immediately after the restart the home team were ahead.

Captain Stanley Kgatla was played through by Dlamini, with Siboniso Gumede slicing down the former in the box and referee Jerome Damon pointing straight to the spot, with Nyadombo converting.

But two minutes later, the Students were level after Jayiya, who came on at the break, sprung the off-side trap, latched onto Tinashe Nengomasha, rounded Kapini to his left and rolled the ball in.

Pattison almost made it 2-1 on the hour mark after a neat exchange of passes with Calvin Cadi, but the shot was deflected wide.

At the other end, Khumalo had no excuses for not giving his team the advantage when he failed to tap in on the goal-line after Dlamini's excellent run and pass from the left side of the box.

Nyadombo had another golden chance with 11 minutes remaining when he headed over from a well-weighted Senamela free-kick, while Thokozani Mshengu did well to control and shoot first time, although the finish was wayward.

That proved the final chances as the two teams had to settle for a draw. – Sapa

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