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Fans, DJs and all that jazz

Getting into the Cape Town Convention Centre was a long and painful process as tickets were double-checked and bags were searched several times after passing through a metal detector.

The heightened security was a result of the attendance of President Jacob Zuma, Cape Town Mayor Patricia De Lille, Communications Minister Yunus Carrim, and Sport and Recreation Minister Fikile Mbalula. 

Rosies – one of the stages that required a second ticket – was where conservative jazz lovers and purists sat to see the Mike Rossi Project, Carmen Lundy, Dr Phillip Tabane & Malombo and Randy Weston’s African Rhythms Trio. 

Kippies, the biggest stage, overflowed with fans when Mi Casa took to the stage. 

A capella group, The Soil, made their festival debut at the Basil “Manenberg” Coetzee stage after having performed at New York’s Apollo Theatre and last year’s Edinburgh International Festival.

Buhle Mda’s microphone cut out ahead of her solo, but she was effortlessly saved by Luphindo "Master P" Ngxanga. 

UK jazz-funk band, Shakatak, performed some of their 1980s hits, including Streetwalkin, Dark is the Night, Day By Day and Night Bird

At the Bassline stage the likes of DJ Project, Tasha’s World, Reason and DJ Black Coffee treated the crowds. 

Local rapper Reason began his performance to a small crowd that quickly grew as he sang some of his most popular tunes such as Keep Debiting, Do It Like I Can, Bump The Cheese Up and A lot On My Mind

The crowd continued to grow when house music DJ Black Coffee came onstage. Black Coffee will perform on Saturday at the Basil "Manenberg" Coetzee stage. 

Saturday's performances include Lalah Hathaway, Bokani Dyer & Kyle Shepherd, Abdullah Ibrahim & Ekaya, Hiatus Kaiyote and the biggest draw this year, Erykah Badu. 

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Rhode Marshall
Rhodé Marshall is the Mail & Guardians arts, culture and entertainment content producer. She started as a radio reporter and producer in Cape Town, before jumping into online news. When there is chaos, she is the responsible, cool and calm one. With one hand glued to her phone and the other to a can of Coca-Cola, she is a pop culture junkie. And dont you dare write her name without the accent on the e, she will make sure that you know how to do it on every device. Visit her blog: rhodemarshall.co.za

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