FW de Klerk: Government policies will drive white South Africans away

Many white South Africans will be forced to leave the country under the current government’s policies, former President FW de Klerk said.

“We have to face the unpalatable fact that our present government has adopted policies that are consciously directed toward harming the core interests of a section of the South African population according to their race,” De Klerk told attendees during the launch of the Centre for Unity in Diversity.

De Klerk criticised the government’s Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) and affirmative action policies, saying they were incrementally limiting the economic and cultural space within which minorities can operate.

“The ultimate goal is a society in which land, jobs, power and wealth will be allocated according to racial compositions of the population. The lives of citizens will once again be determined by race not merit.”

De Klerk said this was bad news for minorities who comprise of 26% of the population.


“Their share of the wealth, jobs and land will decline commensurately over the next 30 years. As the BBBEE noose tightens, it may become increasingly difficult for white South Africans to find employment. Inevitably, many will be forced to leave South Africa.”

Election results reassuring

He said there was a toxic argument, propagated by the current government, seeping into national discourse that whites have not atoned for their sins and all land was stolen from black people.

“That all of these propositions are either false of gross generalisations is neither here nor there. The problem is that they are being actively propagated by our present government and they are fervently believed particularly by government itself and the radicalised youth.”

There were reassurances however, he said.

He told attendees it was reassuring that whatever the government’s ideological ideals might be, it could not implement them without, “causing damage to the country and the interests of its own supporters”.

De Klerk said he was also reassured by the results of the local government elections which signalled an important move away from race-based politics.

“For the first time South Africans voted in significant numbers according to their political convictions and not according to their race.” – News24

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Lizeka Tandwa
Lizeka Tandwa
Lizeka Tandwa Associate Leturer and Co-ordinator of the Honors Programme.

Related stories

South Africa must revisit and refresh its idea of itself

Covid has propelled citizens into feelings of a new shared identity in which the historical force of ‘whiteness’ is fading into irrelevance

Black construction businesses sidelined

When it comes to mega infrastructure projects, it is still the mega white-owned companies who score government contracts

‘Prisoner 913’: The long, zigzagging path to Mandela’s release

A new book draws on the secret archive of NP justice minister Kobie Coetsee to paint a detailed picture of the lead-up to Nelson Mandela’s release. Shaun de Waal spoke to co-author Riaan de Villiers

EFF MPs to be investigated for disrupting parliamentary proceedings

Under the spotlight will be the Economic Freedom Fighters’ behaviour at the State of the Nation address and during the public enterprise department’s budget speech

Right of Reply: M&G chose ‘good story’ over truth — Buthelezi

Mangosuthu Buthelezi says the Ingonyama Trust was not created in a secret deal to ensure his participation in the 1994 election

An inconvenient truth: Virus presents symptoms of socio-economic injustice

The speed at which substantial wealth was given shows that investment in transformation and justice does not enjoy the same humanitarian response
Advertising

Subscribers only

The shame of 40 000 missing education certificates

Graduates are being left in the lurch by a higher education department that is simply unable to deliver the crucial certificates proving their qualifications - in some cases dating back to 1992

The living nightmare of environmental activists who protest mine expansion

Last week Fikile Ntshangase was gunned down as activists fight mining company Tendele’s expansions. Community members tell the M&G about the ‘kill lists’ and the dread they live with every day

More top stories

‘Battle-tested’ vs ‘kind and fair’ — DA candidates’ last push...

John Steenhuisen and Mbali Ntuli both acknowledged the problems faced by the party over the past year, with each of them offering their own leadership vision.

A Landie icon is born

Replacing one of the most-loved cars in history, the new Defender pulls off the near impossible task of doing almost everything better

NSFW: The tricky business of OnlyFans

In an increasingly digital world, OnlyFans has given online creators a new way to make money on their own terms

Q&A Sessions: ‘Keeping quiet is not an option’ — Charlotte...

More than a decade after a brief stint on the opposition benches, Charlotte Lobe is helping to fly the South African flag as a senior public servant in the department of international relations and co-operation
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday