Miners trapped underground at Sibanye-Stillwater op

On Tuesday, Sibanye-Stillwater confirmed that at least 1 800 miners are trapped underground at its Thembelani mine after the rails used to transport workers collapsed.

The workers entered the mine on Tuesday morning and the incident happened around lunch time, when the shift would normally end, Sibanye-Stillwater’s James Wellsted spokesperson told EWN

“We were transporting some rails underground in a conveyance down the shaft. Some of the rails fell down the shaft. So, we’re busy, first of all, removing all obstructions and also doing a full shaft inspection because you need to make sure that there’s been no damage,” Wellsted explained.

Earlier, the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (Amcu) said it had received reports that as many as 4 000 miners were stuck underground.

Amcu says it will monitor the situation and respond accordingly.


This is a developing story and will be updated as more details emerge

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Kiri Rupiah
Kiri Rupiah is the online editor at the Mail & Guardian.

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