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Letters to the editor: June 28 to July 4

Cameron should fix Brexit

Isn’t it a bit weird that we’ve heard nothing from former British prime minister David Cameron about his Brexit?

We’ve seen lots of very busy Tory and European Union busybodies purposefully walking out of buildings and getting into cars holding important papers, and also talking into mobile phones about important things while walking importantly from one place to another.

But, funnily enough, almost the only person in Europe over the age of 45, and certainly the only former politician we haven’t heard from is Cameron.

Isn’t this a bit odd seeing as the Brexit referendum was his idea?

READ MORE: Five pivotal moments behind Brexit chaos

For those who have repressed the memory of how that happened, Cameron promised to hold a referendum on leaving the EU to appease the right wing of his Conservative party. Basically, it was a rather slappy quarrel between two former Etonians (Cameron and Boris Johnson) who wanted to be the prime minister.

To win this fight, Cameron appeased his anti-Europe wing by promising a referendum about leaving Europe. He assumed that everyone in Britain would agree with him, and was shocked when they didn’t.

Theresa May, who voted to remain in the EU, ended up having to take care of things.

READ MORE: Here’s where it all went wrong for Theresa May

Cameron has had astonishingly little to say about his legacy. One of his (very) few comments to the press was to recently say: “The reason I don’t give lots of interviews and answer lots of questions about this is her job is hard enough already without her immediate predecessor giving a running commentary.”

Yes, David. The reason May’s job is hard, is because you accidentally broke Europe while fighting with your friend.

So now that Brexit is the biggest disaster since the invention of selfies, perhaps the person who should clear up the mess is Cameron. Because he is like the person who drank too much at the party, threw up over the sofa and promptly left. Which may be how Etonians do things, but it seems like bad manners to me. — John Davenport, Johannesburg

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