Dieselgate sees recall of Mercedes vehicles

German authorities will probably discover software rigging the level of diesel emissions in Mercedes-Benz cars other than those already sanctioned, the Daimler group has warned.

Daimler is accused of hiding that it used illegal software in diesel cars to cheat emissions tests. Like the entire sector, Daimler must cut the level of CO2 emissions from its cars to comply with European Union standards.

The German Federal Motor Transport Authority has ordered the recall of nearly a million Mercedes cars.

The manufacturer disputes the illegality of the “engine management functions”, but in September agreed to pay a fine of €870-million for selling non-compliant vehicles.

Total charges of €5.5-billion from Dieselgate, which began with Volkswagen in 2015, and a recall of vehicles fitted with faulty airbags from supplier Takata contributed to net earnings slumping by 64% to €2.7-billion last year.


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