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Health

Less is more

New research brings hope for less aggressive and invasive ways of treating breast cancer in patients.

Alarm over demand for designer vaginas

Medical experts have sounded the alarm over the soaring rates of labiaplasty.

Brits falling out of love with drugs

The number of young people taking drugs has fallen by 30% in 15 years. Is the drop down to quality, bad celebrity PR or price?

The heretical idea of making people

The award of the Nobel prize, when it came in October 2010, was long overdue.

Coming to terms with schizophrenia results in revelatory tell-all

To Patrick Cockburn, it's an illness that has eaten away at his oldest child. To Henry Cockburn, it has been an inspiration.

No end to bickering over breastfeeding

Breast or bottle is one of the most intimate and essential decisions a new parent has to make.

Bianca learns to Beat It

An eighth-grade teenager shows how funky and strong her fight against a four-letter word is. Mia Malan reports.

Manto’s last wish

Manto Tshabalala-Msimang hoped to polish her legacy, but in the end she will be remembered for her Aids stance.

Death in the Free State

People in need of treatment are dying because hospitals are desperate for funds, writes Mia Malan.

[From our archives] Could pap help cut your cancer risk?

If you are going to braai this festive season, pap with your meat could lessen your chances of cancer.

Cape doc tipped for health post

Western Cape health director general Craig Househam is widely tipped to take over the running of the National Department of Health.

Cut and mistrust

Traditional leaders are resisting plans to introduce medical circumcision. Mia Malan reports.

Take2: Winds of change sweep SA healthcare

Professors Hoosen Coovadia and Salim Abdool Karim, two of SA's foremost HIV researchers, were recently the health department's greatest enemies.

Nehawu lashes SA Medical Association

Nehawu: The South African Medical Association should get a better grip on OSD negotiations and keep its affiliate members.

Doctors use a torch to do operations

''This year we've been running out of simple things, such as Panado,'' says one doctor.

Ebony and ivory toyi-toyi in harmony

The toyi-toyiing ''helps me to get rid of my frustrations at the hospital'', says one doctor.

Abused from the womb

Pregnant women who drink alcohol put their unborn children at greater risk than they think, writes Mia Malan.

KwaZulu’s health service is sick

The Weekly Mail has taken the lid off horrifying conditions in kwaZulu's medical services.
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