Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Darfur rebels kidnap foreign oil workers

A Darfur rebel group has attacked a Sudanese oilfield and kidnapped a Canadian and an Iraqi worker, a leader of the group said on Thursday, vowing further attacks unless foreign oil companies pull out.

”We attacked Defra oilfield and kidnapped two foreign workers, one is Canadian and another is Iraqi,” said Abdelaziz el-Nur Ashr, field commander for the Justice and Equality Movement in Kordofan, a region to the east of Darfur.

The attack took place on Tuesday, he said, with Darfur peace talks due to begin in Libya on Saturday. The Islamist JEM has already said it will not attend the negotiations, which it has derided as ”a masquerade”.

The oilfield is run by the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company (GNPOC), a consortium involving China’s CNPC, India’s ONGC, Malaysia’s Petronas and Sudanese state-owned Sudapet.

Defra produces more than half of the about 500 000 barrels per day produced in Sudan, most of which is exported to China.

The attack came during a visit to Khartoum by Beijing’s Darfur envoy, Liu Guijin, who said on Wednesday that ”the Darfur issue is developing generally towards a positive direction in spite of some difficulties”.

Liu had been due to leave Sudan for the peace talks in Sirte on Thursday.

In Beijing, Foreign Ministry spokesperson Liu Jianchao confirmed reports that the oilfield in Darfur has been attacked, but said Chinese citizens working there were safe.

There was no immediate confirmation of the attack from the Khartoum government.

The JEM commander said: ”We want China, India and Malaysia to stop oil business because Khartoum is using the oil money to buy arms and kill the people in Darfur. This is our country and they must go,” he told AFP.

”The people of Kordofan are suffering, they are not benefiting from the revenues generated from the oilfields. Instead, they are paying dearly for it with their lives.” — AFP

 

AFP

Subscribe to the M&G

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them.

Related stories

Advertising

Subscribers only

Petro states: What happens when 30% of your national budget...

As the demand for oil shrinks and prices collapse, Africa’s petro states — the likes of Angola, Nigeria, Egypt and Equatorial Guinea — will be left with massive holes in their budgets

More top stories

Petro states: What happens when 30% of your national budget...

As the demand for oil shrinks and prices collapse, Africa’s petro states — the likes of Angola, Nigeria, Egypt and Equatorial Guinea — will be left with massive holes in their budgets

Europe, Asia rob West Africa of fish

Greenpeace Africa reports that the fishmeal and fish oil industry is ‘robbing the Gambia, Mauritania and Senegal of livelihoods and food’

Covid jab tech helps fight malaria

An estimated two-thirds of malaria deaths are among children under the age of five, most of them in Africa.

Learners moving to other provinces puts education departments under pressure

Gauteng and the Western Cape struggle to put children in class, but Limpopo and the Eastern Cape are closing schools as enrolment plummets
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×