Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Marching union disrupts Jo’burg traffic

Traffic in central Johannesburg came to a standstill on Thursday as thousands of South African Municipal Workers’ Union members marched through the city’s streets to the premier’s office.

Marching workers — led by three police cars — were chanting and shouting slogans condemning Ekurhuleni mayor Duma Nkosi for failing to listen to their grievances.

Many of the workers were carrying sticks and sjamboks. Some carried placards, one of which read: ”There are no foreigners, only comrades, peace and justice in our communities.”

Samwu shop steward Steven Ntuli commended Gauteng Premier Mbhazima Shilowa for responding to the union’s letter for permission to march within days of receiving it.

”There’s either a disease or a demon in Ekurhuleni … the premier must give us leaders, because there are no leaders in Ekurhuleni,” he said.

Showing solidarity with the striking workers were members of the South African National Civic Organisation, the Congress of South African Trade Unions and the South African Communist Party.

On Tuesday, two striking municipal workers were wounded when Ekurhuleni metro police fired shots in Boksburg, and four people were shot with pellets by security guards in Kempton Park.

Two cases of attempted murder have since been opened. — Sapa

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Local elections: Water tops the agenda in Limpopo’s dry villages

People in the Fetakgomo Tubatse local municipality, who have to collect water from Motse River, are backing independent candidates because they’re tired of parties’ election promises

Careers the Zondo state capture inquiry has ended (or not)

From Vincent Smith to Gwede Mantashe, those named and shamed have met with differing fates

More top stories

Covid-19 border closures hit Zimbabwe’s women traders hard

The past 18 months have been tough for women cross-border traders, who saw their income vanish when borders closed

Local elections: Water tops the agenda in Limpopo’s dry villages

People in the Fetakgomo Tubatse local municipality, who have to collect water from Motse River, are backing independent candidates because they’re tired of parties’ election promises

A bigger slice of the pie: Retailers find ways to...

The South African informal economy market is much sought-after, with the big, formal-sector supermarkets all looking to grow their share

Careers the Zondo state capture inquiry has ended (or not)

From Vincent Smith to Gwede Mantashe, those named and shamed have met with differing fates
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×