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SAHRC mulls Malema’s ‘kill for Zuma’ remarks

The South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) was on Wednesday still discussing the controversial ”kill for Zuma” remarks made by African National Congress Youth League president Julius Malema.

It would make its decision known before midnight, the SAHRC said.

”We are prepared to die for Zuma,” Malema told a Youth Day rally in Thaba Nchu in the Free State last month.

”We are prepared to take up arms and kill for Zuma,” Malema added at the end of his speech, while the crowd clapped hands and laughed.

SAHRC spokesperson Sello Hatang said the commission was deciding what action to take if Malema did not respond to their deadline.

Two weeks ago, the SAHRC gave Malema 14 days to retract his statement or the commission would take the matter further ”in line with its constitutional mandate”.

Hatang said the commission was still in separate discussions with the African National Congress (ANC) over the matter.

The commission had written to Malema saying his statement was a direct threat to the values enshrined in the Constitution.

”The commission is obligated to inform you that it is a criminal offence to unlawfully and intentionally engage in conduct that defeats or obstructs the course of the administration of justice.

”It is also unlawful behaviour to coerce the government, through violence, into action or inaction. As such the commission regards your utterances as dismissive of the principle of the rule of the law,” the letter read.

Malema since said that his remark was not meant to be taken literally.

He said the use of the word ”kill” was meant to demonstrate ”our love and passion” for ANC president Jacob Zuma. — Sapa

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