Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Ultimatum issued to striking KZN doctors

KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) minister of health Dr Sibongiseni Dhlomo has issued an ultimatum to striking doctors, calling on them to return to work on Friday or face the music.

Addressing the media in Durban on Friday, Dhlomo said notices had been sent to all hospitals calling on all striking doctors, dentists and pharmacists to resume their duties no later than 8am.

The department was also preparing a court interdict to force the striking health professionals to end the strike, he said.

”We as the department of health are designated as an essential service provider and therefore find the action of these health professionals is disrupting service delivery and compromising patients’ lives,” said Dhlomo.

He said the department had been more than reasonable in dealing with the unprotected strike.

”This situation is untenable, we cannot continue to put the lives of our people in danger and the government will act,” he said.

Dhlomo said people had died due to the unavailability of doctors, although he was unable give the number of people who died as a result of the strike.

The department of health had also received information from the National Intelligence Agency that the strike was no longer about salaries.

”It is becoming clearer that this strike action is deeper than what the eye can see. Here we have people who continue striking while their leaders or unions are busy discussing the offer that has been tabled.”

The strike over pay and working conditions started in KwaZulu-Natal four days ago and had crippled public health institutions in urban areas such as Durban and Pietermaritzburg.

Some doctors in other provinces had downed tools.

While the Congress of South African Trade Unions welcomed the pay offer announced by Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi on Wednesday, the striking doctors in KwaZulu-Natal had rejected it and not returned to work. — Sapa

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Basic web lessons for South Africa: Government hacks point to...

Recent cyberattacks at the department of justice and the space agency highlight the extent of our naïveté

If the inflation-driving supply strain in the US lasts, it...

In South Africa, a strong trade surplus, buoyed by robust commodity prices, will cushion our economy against pressure arising from US policy

More top stories

‘Factional’ ANC Veterans League chastised by Motlanthe

ANC Limpopo leaders called on the election committee to change the candidate lists in favour of Ramaphosa faction days before Motlanthe’s report on factions in the party

Sisters pave the way with ecobricks

The durable bricks are made from 30% recycled plastic, some of which they collect from a network of 50 waste pickers

If the inflation-driving supply strain in the US lasts, it...

In South Africa, a strong trade surplus, buoyed by robust commodity prices, will cushion our economy against pressure arising from US policy

Farmers squeezed by big retailers

It may be beneficial for consumers when supermarkets push to get the lowest price from suppliers, but it can harm the farmers
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×