Zimbabwe PM says unity government to continue

Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai and leader of the former opposition party Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) said on Friday his power-sharing pact with veteran President Robert Mugabe would continue as the country’s uneasy unity government passed its two-year mark.

“You may have come across or heard that it’s going to expire,” Tsvangirai told visiting Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi, referring to the power-sharing agreement.

“It has not expired. The inclusive government is [still] there.”

Veteran leader and Zanu-PF leader Mugabe has been pushing for new elections to follow the two-year anniversary of the compromise government despite a deadlock over a new constitution that was supposed to pave the way for the next polls.

“The inclusive government has made notable progress although it has been affected by lack of finance,” Tsvangirai said.


“We hope that the current process of constitution-making will be completed soon.”

Yang, who is visiting Zimbabwe to buttress ties between the two countries, had earlier met Mugabe and several government officials.

Mugabe and Tsvangirai formed the power-sharing government in 2009 to mend an economy ravaged by hyperinflation and avoid a descent into civil war in the aftermath of a bloody presidential run-off election.

As part of the pact, which set out a 24-month timeline for reforms, the parties agreed to draft a new constitution and amend media and electoral laws to ensure free and fair elections. — Sapa-AFP

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Related stories

Remembering Patson Dzamara

Remembering Patson Dzamara, the Zimbabwean activist who never stopped searching for his brother

Why do presidents cling to power?

Four former heads of state speak about what being president is actually like

What is happening in Mali is a coup. We must call it that

Zimbabwe called its coup a military-assisted transition to sidestep sanctions. Mali is doing the same. But failing to call power grabs by their name makes it harder to defend democracy

State of democracy in Africa: Changing leaders doesn’t change politics

The Bertelsmann Transformation Index Africa Report 2020, A Changing of the Guards or A Change of Systems?, suggests that we should be cautious about the prospects for rapid political improvements

Repression in Zimbabwe exposes South Africa’s weakness

The pattern is now well established: crisis, intervention, promises by the Zanu-PF regime to behave, and then relapse after a decent interval to the sort of behaviour that prompted the latest crisis in the first place.

Lies, damn lies and WhatsApp: Why it pays to listen to political rumours in Zim

The rumour mill can shape politics — and reveal uncomfortable truths
Advertising

Subscribers only

Free State branches gun for Ace

Parts of the provincial ANC will target their former premier, Magashule, and the Free State PEC in a rolling mass action campaign

SAA bailout raises more questions

As the government continues to grapple with the troubles facing the airline, it would do well to keep on eye on the impending Denel implosion

More top stories

Hawks swoop down with more arrests in R1.4-billion corruption blitz

The spate of arrests for corruption continues apace in Gauteng and the Eastern Cape.

Catholic NGO boss accused of racism and abuse in Sudan

The aid worker allegedly called his security guard a ‘slave’

Agrizzi too ill to be treated at Bara?

The alleged crook’s “health emergency” — if that is what it is — shows up the flaws, either in our health system or in our leadership as a whole

SANDF hid R200m expenditure on ‘Covid’ drug it can’t use

Military health officials are puzzled by the defence department importing a drug that has not been approved for treating coronavirus symptoms from Cuba
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday