More bodies found in new mass graves in Mexico

At least 11 bodies were found in five new mass graves located in Sinaloa state in north-western Mexico, state prosecutors said on Tuesday.

“After a 10-hour search in the area, we have concluded that we are talking about 11 bodies, two of them women’s,” a Sinaloa prosecutor’s office official told Agence France-Presse.

The mass graves in Sinaloa state, on the Pacific coast, come in addition to the graves located in Tamaulipas state, in the north-east, where 116 bodies have been located so far.

Earlier on Tuesday the Mexican government accused the Zetas drug gang of killing 116 people whose corpses have been found in a series of mass graves near the United States border.

Police have detained 17 suspects and believe gunmen from the notoriously violent cartel dragged the victims off buses passing through the San Fernando area of north-eastern Tamaulipas state.

“We can confirm that a total of 116 people have been found dead as a result of criminal actions apparently caused by actions by the Zetas criminal group,” Attorney General Marisela Morales told reporters.

Extortion, kidnapping
Los Zetas, founded by deserters from the Mexican special forces and thought to have many corrupt former officials and ex-police on its payroll, is at the heart of the narcotics trade and organised crime in Mexico.

Engaged since February 2010 in a turf war for control of lucrative smuggling routes into the United States with the Gulf Cartel — its former employers — the cartel was blamed for the massacre of 72 migrants in August in Tamaulipas.

Mexican officials say that, aside from drug smuggling, the Zetas use extortion and kidnapping to raise money.

The largest concentration of graves ever found in Mexico was unearthed on Thursday in the San Fernando area, about 160km south of the Texan border, and the grisly toll has been rising steadily ever since.

Tamaulipas state officials said at least six buses have been attacked by gunmen this year and several passengers kidnapped. Residents told local media the real toll is far higher. — AFP

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever. But it comes at a cost. Advertisers are cancelling campaigns, and our live events have come to an abrupt halt. Our income has been slashed.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years. We’ve survived thanks to the support of our readers, we will need you to help us get through this.

To help us ensure another 35 future years of fiercely independent journalism, please subscribe.

Advertisting

Odd drop in how Covid-19 numbers grow

As the country hunkers down for a second week of lockdown, how reliable is the data available and will it enable a sound decision for whether South Africans can leave their homes on April 16?

Mail & Guardian needs your help

Our job is to help give you the information we all need to participate in building this country, while holding those in power to account. But now the power to help us keep doing that is in your hands

Press Releases

New energy mix on the cards

REI4P already has and will continue to yield thousands of employment opportunities

The online value of executive education in a Covid-19 world

Executive education courses further develop the skills of leaders in the workplace

Sisa Ntshona urges everyone to stay home, and consider travelling later

Sisa Ntshona has urged everyone to limit their movements in line with government’s request

SAB Zenzele’s special AGM postponed until further notice

An arrangement has been announced for shareholders and retailers to receive a 77.5% cash payout

20th Edition of the National Teaching Awards

Teachers are seldom recognised but they are indispensable to the country's education system

Awards affirm the vital work that teachers do

Government is committed to empowering South Africa’s teachers with skills, knowledge and techniques for a changing world

SAB Zenzele special AGM rescheduled to March 25 2020

New voting arrangements are being made to safeguard the health of shareholders