Hanekom: 'Kill the boer' refers to the struggle only

African National Congress Youth League president Julius Malema’s mimicking of a machine gun whilst singing dubul’ ibhunu, or “Kill the boer”, only bears reference to the armed struggle, the Equality Court heard on Monday.

Testifying in support of Malema’s defence, Science and Technology Deputy Minister Derek Hanekom said the song “was not a call to violence, but was a reference to a period or a system where people took up arms”.

Supporters from as far as Limpopo picketed outside the South Gauteng High Court in support of Julius Malema during his battle with Afriforum for the right to sing the struggle song Dubul’ibhunu, translated as “Shoot the Boer”. A confident Malema riled up his supporters after his third day in court, chanting the controversial lyrics.
Transvaal Agricultural Union of South Africa (Tau-SA) counsel Roelof du Plessis told the court that Malema had been seen making the sign of a gun with his hand, which he showed the court.

He said Malema also mimicked the sound of a machine gun by saying “brrr pah” repeatedly.

Du Plessis told Hanekom earlier during a heated cross-examination, that he was “an extremely evasive witness.
You answer questions like a politician”.

Hate speech
Malema is being tried on a charge brought by Afrikaner interest group AfriForum, which contends that his singing of a struggle song containing the lyrics “dubul’ ibhunu” or “kill the boer” constitutes hate speech.

Hanekom, who is also a member of the ANC national executive committee, suggested a national dialogue on the matter.

He told the court the song bore no reference to an ethnic group, but referred to a system of racial oppression.

Big guns
ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe and Minister in the Presidency Collins Chabane were in court on Monday, and were expected to testify in Malema’s defence.

Malema is expected to take the stand sometime this week in the South Gauteng High Court, which is sitting as the Equality Court.

ANC stalwart and MP Winnie Madikizela-Mandela was also in court on Monday.

She has been at Malema’s side since the start of the case, which has been set down for 10 days.

Renowned South African poet Wally Serote was expected to take the stand next.—Sapa

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