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Bolt wins 100m in 9.91, says he can do better

Usain Bolt remained unbeaten this season by clocking 9.91 on Tuesday to win the 100m at the Golden Spike meet.

In only his second race of the year, Bolt pulled away from fellow Jamaican Steve Mullings to finish with the exact same time he set in Rome last week.

Mullings timed 9.97 for the second place and Daniel Bailey of Antigua was third in 10.08.

The race was held with a slight headwind, but Bolt said he had expected to improve on his performance in Rome, where he only edged Jamaican rival Asafa Powell shortly before the finish line.

“My time 9.91 is not bad but it could be better,” Bolt said. “I expected faster time.”

Bolt’s next stop will be the Bislett Games, a Diamond League meeting in Oslo on June 9 as he warms up for the August 27 to September 4 world championships in Daegu, South Korea.

Double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius was also unhappy with his time in Ostrava.

Pistorius was no closer to qualifying for this year’s world championships and next year’s Olympics after clocking 46.19 seconds to finish sixth in the 400m.

The South African, known as the “Blade Runner,” needs to run a personal-best 45.25 seconds to qualify for the worlds.

“I’m a bit disappointed with the time, I thought I could have done better,” Pistorius said.

He ran a personal best of 45.61 in Pretoria in March and will have more chances at meets in Portland, Oregon, and New York City.

Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica was more impressive, clocking a personal best and world-leading time of 10.76 for a dominant victory in the women’s 100. Campbell-Brown is a double Olympic champion in the 200, but looks likely to be a main contender in the shorter sprint as well at the worlds this year.

“PB didn’t surprise me because I feel I can improve it,” the Jamaican said.

Debbie Ferguson of Bahamas clocked 11.09 in second while another Jamaican, Schillonie Calvert, was third in 11.13.

LJ Van Zyl of South Africa also continued his perfect start to the season, winning the men’s 400 hurdles in 47.66, which equalled the world-leading time he ran in Pretoria in February.

European champion David Greene of Britain was second in 48.47 and Johnny Dutch of the United States third in 48.72.

“Great weather, no wind, no rivals,” Van Zyl said after his comfortable win. “I’m happy that I won again this year, fifth start — fifth victory. … I hope I will stay in good shape until the worlds and become a new world champion.”

Marvin Anderson led a Jamaican sweep in the men’s 200, clocking 20.27 to beat Yohan Blake in 20.38 and Mario Forsyth in 20.43.

Olympic champion and world record-holder Dayron Robles of Cuba ran 13.14 to win the men’s 110 hurdles, defeating Dwight Thomas of Jamaica who clocked 13.24. Terrence Trammel of the United States was third in 13.30.

Paul Kipsiele Koech of Kenya eased to victory in the men’s 3 000 steeplechase in 8:02.55, edging out his countryman Hillary Yego who clocked 8:12.63. Roba Gary of Ethiopia timed 8:15.16 in third.

Francena McCorory of the United States took the women’s 400 in 50.64, followed by Denisa Rosolova of the Czech Republic in 50.84 and another American Sanya Richards-Ross in 50.99

“I’m happy with my performance today,” McCorory said. “The goal is to maintain hard work and get the gold at the worlds.” – Sapa-AP

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