Swedish journalists jailed for 11 years in Ethiopia

An Ethiopian court on Tuesday sentenced two Swedish journalists to 11 years in jail for supporting terrorism and entering the country illegally, after a trial criticised by rights groups.

“The sentence should be punishment of 11 years imprisonment,” Judge Shemsu Sirgaga told the court in the Amharic language through a translator.

“This sentence should satisfy the goal of peace and security,” he added.

Reporter Martin Schibbye and photographer Johan Persson were arrested in Ethiopia’s Ogaden region on July 1 in the company of rebels from the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF) after entering Ethiopia from Somalia.

Both Swedes showed no emotion at the sentencing, as if in shock, according to an Agence France-Presse reporter in the court. A defence lawyer patted Schibbye on the arm as the sentence was read out.


Defence lawyer Abebe Balcha said they would decide later in the week whether to appeal.

“I am not satisfied, as a lawyer for the defendants, I do not agree with the decision,” Abebe said outside the court.

Condemnation
The Swedish Union of Journalists condemned the jail term and called on Sweden to intervene.

“It is obvious that this is a political sentence,” the union’s president Jonas Nordling said in a statement.

“Now the Swedish government has the heavy responsibility of resolving this at the political level,” he added.

“The government must show that Sweden is doing everything possible to support and defend freedom of the press.”

Judges had initially sentenced the pair to 11 years and three months for supporting terrorism and a further three years and three months for entering the country illegally, the court heard.

“The court has actually passed 14 years six months first, and then mitigated it down,” Abebe said, noting the sentence was reduced “because of the reputation of the defendants and also that they have never been involved in crime before”.

Johan’s father, Kjell Persson, said the trial had been difficult on the family.

‘Good shape’
“It was a tough time for us, but we met Johan four or five times and he’s taken it well, it’s good for us to see that,” he said.

“Last Friday we met and they were in good shape, they said what happened on Wednesday was no surprise.”

The two men were convicted last Wednesday and prosecutors had called for a maximum sentence of 18 years and six months in prison.

Their conviction drew heavy criticism from rights groups, with Amnesty International calling for their immediate and unconditional release.

Reporters Without Borders said it was “scandalised” by the verdict.

Human Rights Watch slammed both the “sham convictions” and Ethiopia’s anti-terrorism law, which it said was used to “suppress the legitimate work of the media”. It noted that 29 Ethiopian journalists and opposition members were also on trial under the same law.

However, after Tuesday’s sentencing, Ethiopian government spokesperson Bereket Simon said: “We live by the decision and we fully accept the decision,” dismissing the concerns of rights groups’.

‘Regime change’
“These are the same organisations who are interested only in regime change. We feel these people do not understand the concept of rule of law.”

Both journalists had admitted contact with the ONLF and to entering Ethiopia illegally, but rejected terrorism charges, which included accusations that they had received weapons training.

Persson said their meeting the ONLF contacts had been for professional reasons only, as part of an investigation into the activities of Swedish oil company Lundin Oil.

The ONLF has been fighting for independence of the remote southeastern Ogaden region since 1984, claiming they have been marginalised from Addis Ababa. — AFP

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Jenny Vaughan
Jenny Vaughan
AFP Vietnam bureau chief based in Hanoi, via Hong Kong, Washington, Ethiopia, Ghana and Uganda.

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