Back to the future of healthy eating

There will be hot dogs and pizzas, but no buns or dough; meat, fish, berries and vegetables, but no starch, refined sugars or dairy products. This is fast food that is fit for a caveman.

Although modern Scandinavian cuisine has catapulted the Danish capital to the top of the culinary world, the chef behind takeaway restaurant Paleo looked for inspiration from the Stone Age — or palaeolithic period — to ­create “primal gastronomy”.

“Bread is the devil,” said Thomas Rode Andersen, who has created the menu for Paleo and is head chef at the Michelin-star Kong Hans in Copenhagen. He has become something of a poster boy for the paleo movement in Denmark, but he still allows himself the odd break from the diet.

“There is room for a glass of red wine once in a while. If I want to smoke a cigarette I will do that, but there might be two months in between,” said Andersen.

He hopes his takeaway will inspire people to try a healthy alternative. The menu includes “meatza”, a meat pizza turned upside down with a base of organic ground beef.

Berlin lays claim to Europe’s first paleo restaurant, which opened last year, and the diet has a large following in the United States. Some critics say the original caveman diet was more varied than suggested, pointing to archaeological studies that show traces of grains found on grinding stones dating back 30?000 years.

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