Terry and Ferdinand meet at racism hearing

Ferdinand gave evidence to the independent panel at the hearing, with Terry in attendance to hear the case against him.

Central defender Terry, who dramatically announced his retirement from international football on Sunday, effectively accused the FA of forcing his hand after the governing body pressed on with charges that he racially abused Ferdinand in October.

Terry, who has always denied using a racist slur against his opponent, was found not guilty in a criminal case relating to the incident in a London court in July.

Ferdinand was at Wembley all morning, leaving shortly before midday, while Terry – who will reportedly return on Tuesday – left near 3pm local time (2pm GMT).

The case could last most of the week.


England manager Roy Hodgson said on Monday that he had "reluctantly" accepted John Terry's decision to call time on his international career, as the centre-back contested a Football Association racism charge.

Controversy
Despite the controversy, Hodgson picked Terry in his squad for the European Championship in June and wanted to have the 31-year-old involved in England's bid to qualify for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

"I'd like to thank John Terry for his commitment to the England team since I became manager," said Hodgson. "I am of course disappointed to lose a player of John's international experience and exceptional ability.

"I have enjoyed a good relationship with John during my time as England manager and I reluctantly accept his decision. I can also confirm that he had the courtesy to call me prior to the announcement of his retirement from the England team.

"I'd like to wish John well for the future with Chelsea."

In a separate statement, the FA thanked Terry for his England service.

"Following his announcement that he is retiring from the England team, the FA would like to thank John Terry for all of his efforts with the national team over the past decade," read a statement from the FA.

"During his 78 appearances, John has always given his full commitment to the team."

Impossible position
Former England captain Terry, who is to continue playing for European champions Chelsea, on Sunday hit out at the FA for putting him in what he felt was an impossible position.

"I feel the FA, in pursuing charges against me where I have already been cleared in a court of law, have made my position with the national team untenable," he said in a statement.

But FA general secretary Alex Horne told Sky Sports on Monday: "It's a personal decision. I don't see how we've made it untenable; they're two very separate processes.

"That's a very different process from our England procedures."

Meanwhile, former Chelsea manager Avram Grant criticised the FA for taking the action against Terry.

"Nobody thinks that John Terry is a racist so the FA need to leave it," Grant told the BBC.

"John likes to fight and he's very passionate about the national team so I was surprised," Grant added of Terry's decision to quit England football.

Criminal action
"But he's not a child. He knows what he's doing."

The criminal action had to prove Terry's guilt beyond reasonable doubt but the judge ruled the prosecution had not proved their case to that standard.

Terry had hoped his courtroom acquittal would be the end of the matter as he FA's rule book states that the result of any previous legal action concerning the same matter will "presumed to be correct".

Terry admitted in court he used a racial slur against Ferdinand but said he was merely repeating what he believed Ferdinand had accused him of saying.

The panel, who gave Liverpool striker Luis Suarez an eight-match ban for racially abusing Manchester United defender Patrice Evra last season, said just using racist language was enough to constitute a breach of FA rules. – Sapa-AFP

Subscribe to the M&G for R2 a month

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

And for this weekend only, you can become a subscriber by paying just R2 a month for your first three months.

Julian Guyer
Guest Author

Related stories

The Premier League returns: Strange times, stranger football

English football is set for (another) defiant return, bringing with it several bizarre subplots

Lampard vs Arteta: Managers of a forgotten generation

Two of football’s youngest coaches are competing for one of its highest honours. This tells us something about how the Premier League appoints manager

Manchester City CAS ruling counts for everything and nothing

It may leave a sour taste in the mouth, but the lack of sanction for Manchester City, aside from a fine that amounts to small change, doesn’t affect the bigger picture

Football will define its own destiny as it returns to a strange world

The superstars of the Premier League are back and how they do will determine whether they remain relevant – on and off the pitch

Three things we learned from the Premier League

Derby delight for the Red Devils kept them on Chelsea's coattails in the battle for a top-four finish, but it was also a good Sunday for the Blues as they thrashed Everton 4-0.

Three things we learned from the Premier League

Liverpool lost their invincibility as they were beaten by Watford who climbed out of the relegation zone. The top four race continued with its inconsistency
Advertising

Subscribers only

Q&A Sessions: Frank Chikane on the rainbow where colours never...

Reverend Frank Chikane has just completed six years as the chairperson of the Kagiso Trust. He speaks about corruption, his children’s views and how churches can be mobilised

ANC: ‘We’re operating under conditions of anarchy’

In its latest policy documents, the ANC is self-critical and wants ‘consequence management’, yet it’s letting its members off the hook again

More top stories

‘Where the governments see statistics, I see the faces of...

Yvette Raphael describes herself as a ‘professional protester, sjambok feminist and hater of trash’. Government officials would likely refer to her as ‘a rebel’. She’s fought for equality her entire life, she says. And she’s scared of no one

Covid-19 stems ‘white’ gold rush

The pandemic hit abalone farmers fast and hard. Prices have dropped and backers appear to be losing their appetite for investing in the delicacy

Al-Shabab’s terror in Mozambique

Amid reports of brutal, indiscriminate slaughter, civilians bear the brunt as villages are abandoned and the number of refugees nears half a million

South Africa’s cities opt for clean energy

Efforts to reduce carbon emissions will hinge on the transport sector
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…