Penis contest: May the smallest man win

In Denmark, one of the smallest countries in the world, size clearly matters.

The erotica site, Singlesex.dk owned by Morten Fabricius (45) recently held a competition for the most beautiful penis and now the time has come for the smallest member.

"The smallest is the extreme," Fabricius told AFP. "It's a competition which is weird and funny and almost too much."

"It's a competition which is at the core of manhood, the most important thing for a man. There are so many unhappy men out there, who think you have to have a giant penis, but it's not normal to have a huge one."

Fabricius said he hoped the funny and quirky aspect of the competition would enable people to poke a little fun at a sensitive subject, and give them enough courage to post images anonymously.


The rules are simple: send in a photo to the website with your erection and a measuring tape next to it.

The man with the smallest organ will win, but women will also crown a winner based on votes from the site's female members.

Those two will win an iPhone, and second and third prizes are an iPad 3, Fabricius said. The competition runs until January 31 2013.

"So far we have received six to seven images which are posted but we have more trickling in, which we are vetting to make sure they are not stolen from the web," he said.

"Everything has to be bigger, and bigger, and bigger," he said. "It's incredible how the media has frightened people from showing themselves as they are," he said, in part referring to the porn industry.

Sexologist Vivi Hollaender said she gets a lot of inquiries from men who think their organs are too small.

"The smallest penis was 1.5cm while erected," she said. The man had sent an image to her, and she said he had described having a well-functioning sex life.

"It is frightening how many men are worried that their penis is too small. It can really destroy their quality of life," she said. -Sapa-AFP

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