SA to send troops to join UN mission in DRC

The deployment comes as South Africa is coming to grips with its worst military setback since the end of apartheid in 1994. Thirteen of its troops were killed last month in a shootout with rebels in the neighbouring Central African Republic (CAR). 

"The DRC deployment has nothing to do with the CAR. Neither did the CAR incident influence the decision to send the troops into the DRC. They are two different issues," Brigadier General Xolani Mabanga told Reuters on Sunday. 

The size and timing of the deployment will depend on the terms set by the United Nations, he added.

The Security Council unanimously adopted in late March a resolution establishing the so-called intervention brigade as part of the existing 20 000-strong UN force in Congo, known as Monusco.

It is the first time the United Nations has created such a unit within a traditional peacekeeping force.


Congo's army is fighting M23 rebels in a conflict that has dragged Congo's east back into war and displaced more than half a million people.

The 13 soldiers killed in the Central African Republic were buried at the weekend as questions swirled over whether they had been sent to protect the financial interests of President Jacob Zuma's ruling ANC.

Zuma last week defended his decision to send them, saying they had died fighting for Pretoria's foreign policy, not his party's investments. – Reuters

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Reuters
Guest Author

Related stories

Advertising

Subscribers only

Pandemic hobbles learners’ futures

South African schools have yet to open for the 2021 academic year and experts are sounding the alarm over lost learning time, especially in the crucial grades one and 12

Q&A Sessions: George Euvrard, the brains behind our cryptic crossword

George Euvrard spoke to Athandiwe Saba about his passion for education, clues on how to solve his crosswords and the importance of celebrating South Africa.

More top stories

Inside George Mukhari hospital’s second wave

The Bhekisisa Centre for Health Journalism and James Oatway visited George Mukhari academic hospital to document the second-wave realities experienced by doctors and nurses

Power shift at Luthuli House

Ace Magashule’s move to distance himself from Carl Niehaus signals a rebalancing of influence and authority at the top of the ANC

Trump slinks off world stage, leaving others to put out...

What his supporters and assorted right-wingers will do now in a climate that is less friendly to them is anyone’s guess

The US once again has something  Africa wants: competent leaders

Africa must use its best minds to negotiate a mutually beneficial economic relationship
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…