Tweets stream in over Kenya's Westgate mall shooting

Messages of hope and solidarity from fellow Kenyan citizens and the rest of the world  are streaming in on social media platforms. (Supplied)

Messages of hope and solidarity from fellow Kenyan citizens and the rest of the world are streaming in on social media platforms. (Supplied)

Somalia's al-Shabab militants stormed Nairobi's Westgate mall in Kenya on Saturday, firing at civilians and throwing grenades.
 
While Kenya's military are involved in a stand-off between the extremist forces and Kenya's government, the two-day stand-off continues and has resulted in 68 deaths and 175 injuries. 

Kenya's National Disaster Operation Centre has been active on Twitter, continuously reassuring its followers:

The militants, on the other hand, have used Twitter to react angrily to Kenya's military infiltration and have said that the action was endangering hostages.
(The al-Shabab Twitter account has since been suspended).

Messages of hope
And while all this continues, messages of hope and solidarity from fellow Kenyan citizens and the rest of the world have been streaming in on social media platforms. Let take a look at some of the sentiments shared:

Most Twitter users conveyed their condolences to those who lost their lives or knew of someone who did:
 

Amb Mohamed Ali Nur, Somali Ambassador to Kenya publicly donated blood for the Injured of the Nairobi mall attack.

 

While another social media user posted a message of hope and peace:

Heartfelt images have been widely shared to show solidarity and support for those affected by the seige:



Another message widely shared on social media is "for all those hurt. For all those still in there. For those who've lost loved ones. For those battling it out in hospital. And for those we've sadly lost. We need your prayers."

Haji Mohamed Dawjee

Haji Mohamed Dawjee

Haji Mohamed Dawjee became Africa’s first social media editor in a newsroom at the Mail & Guardian, where she went on to work as deputy digital editor and a disruptor of the peace through a weekly column. A stint as the program manager for Impact Africa – a grant-disbursing fund for African digital journalists – followed. She now pursues her own writing full time by enraging readers of EWN and Women 24 with weekly and bi-monthly columns respectively. She also contributes to the Sunday Times and a range of other publications. Mohamed Dawjee's inaugural book of essays: Sorry, not sorry: Experiences of a brown woman in a white South Africa, is due for release by Penguin Random House in April 2018.Follow her on Twitter: @sage_of_absurd Read more from Haji Mohamed Dawjee

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