AMAs: Miley Cyrus, her giant pussycat and Taylor Swift’s win

Pop diva Taylor Swift was named Artist of the Year at the American Music Awards (AMA) on Sunday, while other big winners included British boy band One Direction and crooner Justin Timberlake.

Swift, who took to the stage in a shiny golden mini-dress, also won favourite country artist and favourite country album for Red at the AMAs, which are voted on by the public.

Other highlights included typically idiosyncratic performances by Lady Gaga and Miley Cyrus, who wrapped up the three-hour show by singing her hit Wrecking Ball with a giant crying kitten.

To which some tweeters responded with the following:

Katy Perry opened the show on a Japanese theme, emerging demurely from behind a geisha-girl flanked screen in a kimono before launching into her latest hit Unconditionally.

Timberlake was the first winner of the show, aired live from the Nokia Theatre in downtown Los Angeles and hosted by Latino rapper Pitbull, taking favourite pop/rock male prize.

He also won best R&B/soul album and best male R&B/soul artist.

Evening's brief political turn
One Direction, who sang a stripped down version of their song Story of My Life
, ended the evening with favourite pop/rock group and favourite pop/rock album for Take Me Home
.

Rihanna took best female R&B/soul artist, and was also presented with an AMA Icon award by her mother, who she joked used to say she had "an annoying, husky, little man voice".

The evening took a brief political turn when best rap/hip-hop album went to Macklemore and Ryan Lewis – who used a satellite link speech from Miami to refer to the notorious killing of black Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

"Due to the fact that we are in Florida … I want to acknowledge Trayvon Martin and the hundreds and hundreds of kids each year that are dying due to racial profiling and the violence that follows it," said Macklemore.

But it was left to Cyrus – closely watched ever since her twerking turn at the MTV Video Music awards – to end the show in suitably twitter-storming style, in a cat-covered bikini and with a giant orange and white kitten singing along behind her. – AFP

Advertisting

De Klerk now admits apartheid was a crime against humanity

Apartheid’s last president walks back comments that definition was a Soviet plot

February 11 1990: Mandela’s media conquest

Nelson Mandela’s release from prison was also South Africa’s first ‘media event’. And, despite the NP’s, and the SABC’s, attempt to control the narrative, the force of Madiba’s personality meant that he emerged as a celebrity

Eastern Cape MEC orders graft investigation after two workers killed...

The killing of two council workers at the Amathole district municipality appears to be linked to tender fraud and corruption

Strike-off case pulls in judge

Judge Mushtak Parker is implicated in an application to strike off his former partners. He is also involved in the fight between the Western Cape high court’s judge president and his deputy
Advertising

Press Releases

Response to the report of the independent assessors

VUT welcomes the publishing of the report of the independent assessors to investigate concerns of poor governance, leadership, management, corruption and fraud at the university.

NWU student receives international award

Carol-Mari Schulz received the Bachelor of Health Sciences in Occupational Hygiene Top Achiever Award.

Academic programme resumes at all campuses

Lectures, practicals, seminars and tutorials will all resume today as per specific academic timetables.

Strategic social investments are a catalyst for social progress

Barloworld Mbewu enables beneficiaries to move away from dependence on grant funding

We all have a part to play to make South Africa work

Powering societal progress demands partnerships between all stakeholders

So you want to be a social entrepreneur?

Do the research first; it will save money and time later

Social entrepreneurship means business

Enterprises with a cause at their core might be exactly what our economy desperately needs

Looking inwards

Businesses are finding tangible ways to give back – but only because consumers demand it