Mandela’s ‘Long Walk to Freedom’ was Africa’s story too

The continent's leaders have described Nelson Mandela as one of the greatest figures of contemporary Africa.

Ghana's President John Dramani Mahama said: "It is no coincidence that in the years since Mandela's release, so much of Africa has turned toward democracy and the rule of law. His utilisation of peace as a vehicle of liberation showed Africa that if we were to move beyond the divisiveness caused by colonisation and the pain of our self-inflicted wounds, compassion and forgiveness must play a role in governance."

"The Long Walk to Freedom was also Africa's story. The indignation that once permeated our continent has been replaced by inspiration. The undercurrent of pessimism resulting from the onslaught of maladies – wars, coups, disease, poverty and oppression – has given way to a steadily increasing sense of possibility. It wasn't just Nelson Mandela who was transformed during those years of his imprisonment. We all were. And Africa is all the better because of that."

Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan said: "Mandela will always be remembered and honoured by all mankind as one of its greatest liberators, a wise, courageous and compassionate leader, and an icon of true democracy. Mandela's death will create a huge vacuum that will be difficult to fill in our continent." 

Senegal's President Macky Sall said: "We have lost a giant, one of the greatest figures in contemporary Africa. No man of our time has given so much for the cause of his people, for Africa, and for the good of mankind. Nelson Mandela taught us courage, strength, forgiveness. He showed us that a human being could be better."

President Paul Kagame of Rwanda said in a tweet: "Madiba, South Africa's first post-apartheid president, passes on. But what is certain is he will continue to live in the hearts of many of us. Rest in peace."

We make it make sense

If this story helped you navigate your world, subscribe to the M&G today for just R30 for the first three months

Subscribers get access to all our best journalism, subscriber-only newsletters, events and a weekly cryptic crossword.”

Sarah Evans
Sarah Evans

Sarah Evans interned at the Diamond Fields Advertiser in Kimberley for three years before completing an internship at the Mail & Guardian Centre for Investigative Journalism (amaBhungane). She went on to work as a Mail & Guardian news reporter with areas of interest including crime, law, governance and the nexus between business and politics. 

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Latest stories

Lights, camera, action!

Meet Kuda Jemba, the emerging film director who went from directing music videos for some of SA’s biggest stars to directing Kelly Khumalo’s upcoming reality show

Is the US supreme court bent on doing harm?

Two recent rulings by America’s apex court are profoundly troubling

War on diamonds: Toil and triumph on the rich barren...

“I’m willing to take a bullet” says Northern Cape natives who claim the land, and its diamonds, belong to them.

Shell v Wild Coast: Science, research and erring on the...

Court applicants have argued that the company should be required to conduct an environmental impact assessment, based on the best available science, which has advanced considerably since Shell’s permit to conduct seismic surveys was granted
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×