Ferguson protests resume over Michael Brown’s death

More than 100 demonstrators marched peacefully in St Louis on Tuesday, calling for the arrest of a white police officer who shot dead an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, almost three weeks ago.

By nightfall, a small group of about 30 protesters marched along the street that has been the centre of demonstrations since the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, where the majority of residents are black and most elected officials and police are white. The atmosphere was subdued and the police presence was limited.

Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson, who shot Brown, has been put on paid leave and is in hiding. A St Louis county grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the US justice department has opened its own investigation.

Attention on US race relations
Brown’s death focused global attention on the state of race relations in the US, and evoked memories of other racially charged cases, including the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old African-American, in Florida in 2012.

Martin was shot by a neighbourhood watch volunteer, who claimed self-defence and was acquitted of second-degree murder and of manslaughter.


Family and supporters of Brown celebrated his life on Monday at a music-filled funeral service at a St Louis church that rang with calls for peace and police reforms.

The August 9 shooting sparked two weeks of racially charged demonstrations, some with violent clashes and scores of arrests, in which protesters demanded Wilson be charged in Brown’s death. Demonstrations have been more subdued in recent days.

Police have said Brown struggled with Wilson, who shot and killed him. However, some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest. – Reuters

Subscribe to the M&G for R2 a month

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

And for this weekend only, you can become a subscriber by paying just R2 a month for your first three months.

Edward Mcallister
Reuters correspondent, West and Central Africa Edward Mcallister has over 2058 followers on Twitter.

Related stories

Q&A Sessions: ‘I think I was born way before my time’ — Mamodupi Mohlala

The chief executive of the Estate Agency Affairs Board and the deputy chair of the SABC board, shares her take on retrenchments at the public broadcaster and reveals why she hates horror movies

See people as individual humans, not as a race

We need to ingrain values of equality in education, businesses, society broadly and religious groups to see people

Finding my faith in Trump’s America

From the heady days of Obama’s inauguration to the everyday fears of living while black, Jakki Kerubo had a front-row seat to one of the most turbulent periods in US history

Inside the illicit trade in West Africa’s oldest artworks

Nok terracottas are proof that an ancient civilisation once existed in Nigeria. Now they are at the centre of a multimillion-dollar, globe-spanning underground industry — and once again, Nigeria is losing out

Catholic NGO boss accused of racism and abuse in Sudan

The aid worker allegedly called his security guard a ‘slave’

Distraction, intimidation and future alliances define events at Senekal

The lack of compassion towards Brendin Horner’s family is the failure of identity politics
Advertising

Subscribers only

Q&A Sessions: Frank Chikane on the rainbow where colours never...

Reverend Frank Chikane has just completed six years as the chairperson of the Kagiso Trust. He speaks about corruption, his children’s views and how churches can be mobilised

ANC: ‘We’re operating under conditions of anarchy’

In its latest policy documents, the ANC is self-critical and wants ‘consequence management’, yet it’s letting its members off the hook again

More top stories

Covid-19 stems ‘white’ gold rush

The pandemic hit abalone farmers fast and hard. Prices have dropped and backers appear to be losing their appetite for investing in the delicacy

Al-Shabab’s terror in Mozambique

Amid reports of brutal, indiscriminate slaughter, civilians bear the brunt as villages are abandoned and the number of refugees nears half a million

South Africa’s cities opt for clean energy

Efforts to reduce carbon emissions will hinge on the transport sector

How designing ‘green’ buildings can help to combat the climate...

South Africa’s buildings account for 40% of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions. But the City of Johannesburg’s new draft green buildings policy aims to change that
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…