Nigeria: Patients discharged from hospital after building collapse

Six people who were injured in a building collapse in Nigeria have been discharged from the Steve Biko Academic Hospital and have been cleared of any dangerous infections.

“It was five but now its gone up to six that have been discharged,” the hospital’s deputy chief executive Dr Mathabo Mathebula told Sapa on the telephone. “None of the [25 admitted] patients had any dangerous infections, they are all fine.” 

Around 115 people, among them 84 South Africans, were killed and dozens trapped when a multi-storey guesthouse attached to the Synagogue Church of All Nations, run by Nigerian preacher TB Joshua, collapsed in Lagos on September 12. Some 350 South Africans were thought to be visiting the church when the accident happened. Twenty-five injured survivors arrived in South Africa on Monday and were taken to the hospital for treatment. 

At the time, Deputy Social Development Minister Hendrietta Bogopane-Zulu told reporters in Pretoria that the 25 patients were under a 48-hour lockdown to check for airborne diseases. “Everybody coming out of Lagos is on a 48-hour lockdown. They can’t leave the hospital until the 48 hours are over,” she said. 

At the time the relieved families of the injured were allowed around five minutes to engage with them when they arrived. Mathebula told Sapa it was not a “lockdown” but an observation. “It was an observation to make sure that everything was treated, not only infections but also injuries,” she said. “We were making sure they got proper treatment and making sure each and every problem was being treated.” 


She said of the 25 that were admitted to hospital, two remained in a critical condition, while a few others were seriously injured. “Many of the them had broken arms and legs. Most of them are women. I must say they are recovering very well. They just need extra care. Most of them still need further treatment that’s why they are still in hospital.” 

Trauma counselling
All the injured survivors also received trauma counselling at hospital, said Mathebula. The SABC, meanwhile, reported that another 38 South African survivors had returned to the country on Wednesday morning. “They were quickly whisked away by security and police shortly after their arrival at OR Tambo International Airport to receive counselling,” it reported. – Sapa

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