Study shows rise in race tolerance

There's good news too: interracial mistrust has steadily decreased, from 40.6% in 2003 to 28.1% in 2013.

There's good news too: interracial mistrust has steadily decreased, from 40.6% in 2003 to 28.1% in 2013.

The South African Reconciliation Barometer survey from the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation was released this week, evaluating changes in social attitudes and political views between 2003 and 2013.

Among the survey’s findings, writes author Dr Kim Wale, is that “the desire for a united South Africa has decreased by 17.9% from 72.9% in 2003 to 55% in 2013”.

Further, she says: “The top four identity associations chosen by South Africans between 2003 and 2013 are language, race, ethnicity and South African identity.”

“Between 2003 and 2013, race increased in popularity as a primary South African identity, and though South African nationality remains in the top four categories, it has decreased in popularity over time. Despite this, interracial mistrust has steadily decreased, from 40.6% in 2003 to 28.1% in 2013.”

In 2003, 70.4% of black South Africans said they trust Parliament. By 2013 this figure had dropped to 52.9%. Similarly, this group’s trust in national leaders declined from 62.5% to 53.8%. The survey also showed that “South Africans are 10.1% less likely to agree that apartheid was a crime against humanity in 2013 than they were in 2003”.

The report is available at ijr.org.za and reconciliationbarometer.org

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