Guinea declared Ebola free

Guinea was declared free of Ebola on Tuesday after more than 2 500 people died from the virus in the West African nation, leaving Liberia as the only country still awaiting a countdown for the end of the epidemic.

People in the capital, Conakry, greeted the declaration by authorities and the UN World Health Organisation with mixed emotions given the deaths and the damage the virus did to the economy and the country’s health and education sectors.

“Several of my family are dead. This situation has shown us how much we must fight for those who are survivors,” Fanta Oulen Camara, who works for Medecins Sans Frontieres Belgium, said.

“After I got better, the hardest thing was to make people welcome me. Most people that normally supported me abandoned me. Even the school where I was an instructor dropped me. It was very hard,” said Camara (26) who fell ill in March 2014.

Many children orphaned
Ebola has orphaned about 6 200 children in Guinea, said Rene Migliani, an official at the national coordination centre for the fight against Ebola.


There were more than 3 800 Ebola cases in Guinea out of more than 28 600 cases globally with 11 300 deaths, according to figures from the WHO. Almost all the cases and deaths were in Guinea and its neighbours Liberia and Sierra Leone.

A country is declared Ebola free 42 days after the recovery or death of the final patient and if there are no new infections.

Liberia has lost more than 4 800 people to the haemorrhagic fever, but if all goes well will be declared virus-free in January. The country was declared Ebola free in May and September, but each time new cases emerged.

Sierra Leone officially ended its epidemic in November.

Subscribe to the M&G

These are unprecedented times, and the role of media to tell and record the story of South Africa as it develops is more important than ever.

The Mail & Guardian is a proud news publisher with roots stretching back 35 years, and we’ve survived right from day one thanks to the support of readers who value fiercely independent journalism that is beholden to no-one. To help us continue for another 35 future years with the same proud values, please consider taking out a subscription.

Saliou Samb
Guest Author

Related stories

Is WhatsApp shaping democracy in Africa?

A study shows that the social messaging platform is both emancipatory and destructive, particularly during election campaigns

Human health, animal health and environmental health are inextricably linked

To take care of ourselves, we must take care of the world around us

Inclusive cabinets don’t improve governance or reduce conflict

Research on 3 916 ministers in 23 African countries shows that cabinets are representative and that leaders select members to reduce internal threats from challengers

Covid-19 deepens the educational divide

With the closure of schools, learning has moved to online platforms across the world, but a UNESCO report said only 12% of households in the least-developed countries have internet access at home

The coping mechanisms the DRC is putting in place as it faces Ebola, measles and Covid-19

The DRC has systematically gone about strengthening health infrastructure, engaging the community and doing better research

Images of black death satisfy disturbing desires and purposes

The protests sweeping the United States after the latest police killing of a black man again speak to the ability of images to evoke powerful emotional responses
Advertising

Ingonyama Trust Board moves to retrench staff

More than 50 workers at the Ingonyama Trust Board have been issued section 189 notices

No proof of Covid-19 reinfection, yet

Some people report testing positive for Covid-19 after initially having the disease and then testing negative. Scientists are still trying to understand if this means that reinfection is possible
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…

The best local and international journalism

handpicked and in your inbox every weekday