Edward Zuma to apologise for Gordhan, Hanekom ‘sell-out’ comments

Former president Jacob Zuma’s son Edward has agreed to apologise to all South Africans for his “sell out” hate speech remarks directed at ministers Pravin Gordhan and Derek Hanekom last year.

READ MORE: Zuma’s son in foot-in-mouth case

In terms of an settlement agreement, which came before Durban’s Equality Court on Tuesday, he is to pay damages of R60 000 ― which will be split between two needy schools in the Durban area.

Zuma initially opposed the application, which was launched by the SA Human Rights Commission.

READ MORE: Human Rights Commission wants Edward Zuma to fork out a R100 000 for hate speech


However, on Tuesday morning he attended court with his lawyer and assisted with the drafting of the agreement.

He left court before it was read into the record.

His comments were labelled hate speech and he was directed to issue an unconditional apology within seven days. It has to be directed to all South Africans, and it will published by the commission.

Zuma’s comments were made in an open letter. It in he called Hanekom an askari, “no better than a vile dog”, and Gordhan a racist who viewed black people as nothing more than “k*****s”. ― News24

READ MORE: Edward Zuma: Gordhan’s ‘crew of smurfs’ on tour to degrade ANC leaders

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