Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

‘It’s terrible’: Stunned Federer feeling low after Wimbledon shock

Roger Federer admitted he was shell-shocked as the Swiss star struggled to come to terms with his “terrible” Wimbledon quarter-final exit against Kevin Anderson.

Federer suffered one of the most stunning defeats of his career on Wednesday, blowing a two-set lead and wasting a match point in a 2-6, 6-7 (5/7), 7-5, 6-4, 13-11 loss.

Federer’s bid to win a ninth Wimbledon title came to an astonishing end as the defending champion collapsed in a nail-biting four hour and 13 minute classic that ranks among the tournament’s greatest upsets.

READ MORE: Epic five-setter: Anderson defeats Federer at Wimbledon

The 36-year-old had needed only 26 minutes to take the first set, leaving him horrified as a fifth successive Wimbledon semi-final slipped through his fingers from such a commanding position.

“To be honest, I didn’t feel mental fatigue (during the match). Now I feel horribly fatigued and just awful,” Federer said.

“As the match went on, I couldn’t surprise him any more. That’s a bad feeling to have.

“I couldn’t come up with enough good stuff for him to miss more. I think that was the key at the end.

“It’s just terrible. But that’s how it goes, you know. I didn’t see it coming.”

It was Federer’s earliest departure from Wimbledon since his shock second round defeat against Sergiy Stakhovsky in 2013.

For the only the second time at Wimbledon, Federer was beaten after holding a two-set lead, with his previous loss from that position coming against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the 2011 quarter-finals.

Anderson’s huge serve kept Federer on the back foot and the towering eighth seed also fared much better than expected in the baseline rallies.

“I was very happy that I got off to the right start of the match, was able to take control somewhat of the game. I just don’t know exactly how I couldn’t create more opportunities once the third set came around,” Federer said.

“I wasn’t feeling particularly well off the baseline. I couldn’t really get the rallies going the way I wanted to, especially 1-2 punch wasn’t working at all

“It’s disappointing. No doubt about it. But he was solid. He got what he needed when he had to.

“Credit to him for hanging around really that long.”

Federer was playing on Court One for the first time in three years, but the 20-time Grand Slam champion denied his surprise move from Centre Court was a factor.

“I don’t think it would have changed if I played there last year. It’s not like I would have remembered exactly how it would have felt,” he said.

“I don’t think it really mattered, to be honest. I had my chances and blew them. That’s my problem really.”

Federer was appearing at Wimbledon for the 20th time and 15 years after he first won the title, there were inevitably questions about whether the father of four had played his last match at his favourite tournament.

Asked if losing to Anderson would spur him to return and make amends next year, Federer hinted he didn’t plan to walk away just yet.

“Yeah, of course, the goal is to come back here next year,” said Federer, who has won three Grand Slams over the last two years.

READ MORE: Is Roger Federer in danger of losing his iconic logo?

“I wouldn’t call it ‘unfinished business’. I felt like I did some good business here in the past already So I’m all right. Just disappointed now.

“I just love being around here. It’s a good vibe. We have a good time as a family. I have great memories from here. My heroes all won here.

“It motivates me to do extremely well here because I don’t want to sit here and explain my loss. That’s the worst feeling you can have as a tennis player.” 

Subscribe for R500/year

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them and get a 57% discount in your first year.

Steve Griffiths
Guest Author

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

R350 social relief grant not enough to live on

Nearly half of the population in South Africa — one of the most unequal countries in the world — is considered chronically poor.

More top stories

Afrobeats conquer the world

From Grammys to sold-out concerts, the West African music phenomenon is going mainstream

R350 social relief grant not enough to live on

Nearly half of the population in South Africa — one of the most unequal countries in the world — is considered chronically poor.

US fashion contaminates Africa’s water

Untreated effluent from textile factories in in Lesotho, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mauritius and Madagascar pours into rivers, contaminating the water

Deep seabed mining a threat to Africa’s coral reefs

The deep oceans are a fragile final frontier, largely unknown and untouched but mining companies and governments — other than those in Africa — are eying its mineral riches
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×