Duduzani Zuma culpable homicide case postponed

UPDATE: The defence in the culpable homicide case of Duduzani Zuma has been given more time to study dockets, leading to the postponement of the case in the Randburg Magistrate’s Court. The matter was postponed to October 26 for the defence to clarify pre-trial issues.

Zuma and his father, former president Jacob Zuma, appeared happy and jolly before proceedings got under way, cracking jokes and asking journalists how they were doing.



Duduzani Zuma, the son of former president Jacob Zuma, is expected back in the Randburg Magistrate’s Court on Thursday to answer to two counts of culpable homicide.

At his last appearance in July, the case was postponed for the disclosure of inquest proceedings and content of the docket.

Zuma was summoned to court after the National Prosecuting Authority decided to go ahead with prosecuting him after declining to do so in July 2014, citing insufficient evidence.


The case relates to a car accident that occurred in February 2014, when Zuma crashed into a taxi after losing control of his Porsche on the Grayston Drive off-ramp on the M1 north of Johannesburg.

Phumzile Dube was killed instantly, while three others were injured.

A second woman, Jeanette Mashaba, died a couple of weeks later. However, during the inquest it was found that her death was not a result of the accident and that she died in hospital of natural causes.

Media previously reported that Zuma denied any wrongdoing in both the culpable homicide case and the corruption case, which is being heard in the Johannesburg Commercial Crime Court.

Zuma is charged with corruption, alternatively conspiracy to commit corruption, relating to an alleged R600-million offer made to former deputy finance minister Mcebisi Jonas in 2016 by Ajay Gupta, in Zuma’s presence.

The state alleged that Gupta offered Jonas the position of finance minister at the family’s Saxonwold compound.

Jonas claimed he refused the offer and left.

The state also claimed that Zuma was party to the crime because he was present. — News24

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Jenna Etheridge
Jenna Etheridge
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