Tour 2.0

Daniel Adidwa is the 29-year-old chief executive of Tour 2.0, a young and vibrant company that’s focused on providing unique urban, cultural and community tourism experiences in South Africa. The company takes travellers on journeys of discovery, giving them experiences and introducing them to places that make them feel at home.

“Most of the people who visit our site want to experience South Africa in an entirely new way,” says Adidwa. “This has inspired us to create a catalogue of really different and unusual cultural and community tourism experiences that give them the space to discover South Africa and all its remarkable flavours.”

In Johannesburg, travellers can visit Newtown and become immersed in the history and culture of the area. In Cape Town they can take a culinary tour of the streets and in Knysna they can unlock the vibrant township life. There are so many different places that no one experience is the same.

“We wanted to create new African perceptions and we found that the best way to do this was to enable visitors to experience what makes each of our cultures and communities unique,” says Adidwa. “Our tours aren’t just for tourists and expats, they are also for locals and they range from meeting and dining with the Nama people in Kuboes in the Northern Cape to having high tea with Rastafarians in Judah Square.”

Tour 2.0 is a new way of exploring. A quick visit to the bright website will immediately immerse the visitor in a one-stop-shop for anything out of the ordinary when visiting South Africa and one of its towns.


“We are extremely passionate about uncovering community experiences that reflect the authentic nature of our country,” concludes Adidwa. “We also do every one of our tours ourselves to ensure they are packaged properly, the community is tourist friendly, and the guide well versed in the tour. We also ensure that our work enhances social good and makes a difference.”

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Tamsin Oxford
Tamsin Oxford
I am a professional editor, journalist, blogger, wordsmith, social junkie and writer with over 19 years of experience in both magazine publishing and Public Relations.
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