Get more Mail & Guardian
Subscribe or Login

Cannabis cultivation gets the royal nod in KwaZulu-Natal

 

 

King Goodwill Zwelithini is gearing up to join South Africa’s “green revolution”, with plans already under way to grow cannabis for medicinal purposes on land in KwaZulu-Natal under his control.

Go Life International, a listed company that manufactures health supplements, has been in talks with the Ingonyama Trust Board since last year to grow cannabis on a 75-hectare stretch of trust land on the North Coast.

The trust has approached consultants in the cannabis industry with a view to them training people living in the area to grow and process cannabis for the medicinal and recreational markets.

Last month Zwelithini told the opening of the KwaZulu-Natal provincial legislature that the time had come for people in the province’s rural areas to start investigating growing and processing cannabis for medicinal products. He called on government and the farming community to recognise the economic potential of cannabis now that its personal use had been decriminalised, and to take a “very close look” at the industry as a means of fighting unemployment and poverty in the province.

Ahmed Jamaloodeen, treasurer of the Cannabis Development Council of South Africa, said that all measures to place cannabis within the mainstream of the economy should be encouraged. “Cannabis is a new kid on the block, but as we move forward there will be more and more developments. What about cannabis banking; cannabis crop insurance; medical aid for employees in the cannabis industry?” he said.

Krithi Thaver, founder of Canna Culture and Holistic Releaf, South Africa’s first legal cannabis dispensary, said he had been approached by the Ingonyama Trust. “There was an initial discussion around the idea of setting up training camps for communities living on land administered by the trust in both the cultivation and processing of cannabis … we are open to any initiative which will assist in empowering ordinary people to enter the industry.”

Subscribe to the M&G

Thanks for enjoying the Mail & Guardian, we’re proud of our 36 year history, throughout which we have delivered to readers the most important, unbiased stories in South Africa. Good journalism costs, though, and right from our very first edition we’ve relied on reader subscriptions to protect our independence.

Digital subscribers get access to all of our award-winning journalism, including premium features, as well as exclusive events, newsletters, webinars and the cryptic crossword. Click here to find out how to join them.

Paddy Harper
Paddy Harper
Storyteller.

Related stories

WELCOME TO YOUR M&G

If you’re reading this, you clearly have great taste

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe to the Mail & Guardian for less than the cost of a cup of coffee a week, and get more great reads.

Already a subscriber? Sign in here

Advertising

Subscribers only

Cape Flats gangsters, children die in fight over turf

Extortion rackets are part of a corrupt system that includes religious leaders, councillors, police and syndicates

Tobacco farmers want the taxman to do more to control...

The Black Tobacco Farmers’ Association the introduction of a minimum price level for cigarettes

More top stories

Cape Flats gangsters, children die in fight over turf

Extortion rackets are part of a corrupt system that includes religious leaders, councillors, police and syndicates

Father and son abandon gangs to start a project of...

After spending more than 40 years in a life of gangsterism, Ralph Haricombe’s life changed after his son asked him to change his life

Predators: Beauties or beasts?

How farmers perceive jackal and caracal — as ‘beautiful’ or ‘thieves’ — determines whether they will tolerate them on their livestock farms

Creecy taken to court over oil, gas plan

An environment group says its application is a ‘watershed’ case for stopping deep sea exploration
Advertising

press releases

Loading latest Press Releases…
×